CURRICULUM VITAE

Howard Markel, M.D., Ph.D.

George E. Wantz, M.D. Distinguished Professor of the History of Medicine
Director, Center for the History of Medicine
Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases
Professor of History
Professor of Health Management and Policy
Professor of Psychiatry
Professor of English Language and Literature
The University of Michigan

EDUCATION

1974-1978    Southfield-Lathrup High School, Lathrup Village, Michigan

1978-1982    A.B. (summa cum laude in English Literature), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan

1982-1986    M.D. (cum laude eruditionis causa), University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan

1989-1994    Ph.D. (History of Science, Medicine and Technology), The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

POSTDOCTORAL TRAINING

1986-1987    Intern and Clinical Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine

1987-1988    Junior Assistant Resident and Clinical Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine

1988-1989    Senior Assistant Resident and Clinical Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine

1989-1991    Senior Clinical Fellow, Adolescent Medicine and General Academic Pediatric Development, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine

1989-1993    Owsei Temkin Fellow in the History of Medicine, Institute of the History of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University

1991-1993    Harriet Lane Research Fellow, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine

ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS

1993-1998    Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan Medical School

1996-            Director, Center for the History of Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School

1998-2002    Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases (with tenure), University of Michigan Medical School

1999-2002    Associate Professor, Department of History, College of Literature, Science and the Arts, University of Michigan

1999-2000    Inaugural Scholar in Residence, Center for Scholars and Writers, The New York Public Library, New York, New York

2000-2006    George E. Wantz Professor of the History of Medicine, University of Michigan

2002-            Professor of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases (with tenure), University of Michigan Medical School

2002-            Professor of History, College of Literature, Science and the Arts, University of Michigan

2004-            Professor of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan

2004-            Professor of Psychiatry, University of Michigan Medical School

2006-2007    John Rich Professor at the Institute for the Humanities, University of Michigan

2006-            George E. Wantz Distinguished Professor of the History of Medicine, University of Michigan

2011-            Professor of English Literature and Language, College of Literature, Science and the Arts, University of Michigan

2013-            Editor-in-Chief, The Milbank Quarterly

HOSPITAL  APPOINTMENTS

1989-1993    Attending Physician, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital

1993-2010    Attending Physician, The University of Michigan Health System

2003-2010    Attending Pediatrician, Addiction and Treatment Service, the University of Michigan Health System

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books

  1. Markel, H., Oski, F.A.:  The H.L. Mencken Baby Book. Philadelphia, Hanley and Belfus, 1990.
  2. Markel, H., Oski, J.A., Oski, F.A., McMillan, J.:  The Portable Pediatrician. Philadelphia, Hanley and Belfus-Mosby-Yearbook, Inc., 1992.
  3. Markel, H., Oski, F.A.:  The Practical Pediatrician: The A-Z Guide to Your Child’s Health, Behavior, and Safety. New York, Scientific American/W.H. Freeman, 1996.
  4. Markel, H.:  Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892. Baltimore and London, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1997; paperback edition, Baltimore and London, The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.
  5. Markel, H., Farrell, M.H., Oski, J.A.:  The Portable Pediatrician, Second Edition. Philadelphia, Hanley and Belfus, 2000.
  6. Markel, H.:  When Germs Travel: Six Major Epidemics That Invaded America Since 1900 and the Fears They Have Unleashed.  New York, Pantheon Books/Alfred A. Knopf Books, 2004. (Simultaneously published in Canada: Toronto: Random House of Canada, Ltd., 2004; paperback edition published by Vintage Books/Random House, New York, 2005).
  7. Markel, H.:  An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted, and the Miracle Drug Cocaine.  New York: Pantheon Books/Alfred A. Knopf, 2011. (Simultaneously published in Canada: Toronto: Random House of Canada, Ltd., 2011).
  8. Markel, H.:  The Kelloggs: The Battling Brothers of Battle Creek. (New YorkPantheon Books/PenguinRandomHouse, 2017, simultaneously published in Canada and Great Britain.)
  9. A.M. Stern, H. Markel.  The History of Vaccines and Immunization:  Familiar Patterns, New Challenges.  IN: J.L. Schwartz, A.L. Caplan, eds.  Vaccination Ethics and Policy:  An Introduction and Readings.  (Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2017), pp. 2-16

Books (edited volumes)

  1. Markel, H., Tarolli, J. (eds.): Caring for Children: A Celebration of the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan, Historical Center for the Health Sciences Monographs, no. 5. Ann Arbor, 1998.
  2. Izenberg, N., Dowshen, S., Bass, E., Berkin, B., Markel, H., Seifer, E. (eds.): Human Diseases and Conditions (3 volumes). New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2000.
  3. Stern, A.M., Markel, H. (eds.): Formative Years: Children’s Health in the United States, 1880-2000.  Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2002; paperback edition, Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2004.

Digital publications

  1. Navarro, J.A., Markel, H. (co-editors-in chief): The 1918-1919 American Influenza Pandemic: A Digital Encyclopedia and Archive 2.0.  Developed by the University of Michigan Center for the History of Medicine and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (First edition, 1.0, Ann Arbor: the University of Michigan Scholarly Publication Office, 2012; Second edition, 2.0, Ann Arbor: the University of Michigan Scholarly Publication Office, 2016). Accessed at influenzaarchive.org

Government Reports

  1. Markel, H., Stern, A.M., Navarro, J.A., Michalsen, J.R.:  A Historical Assessment of Nonpharmaceutical Disease Containment Strategies Employed by Selected U.S. Communities during the Second Wave of the 1918-1920 Influenza Epidemic.  U.S. Department of Defense/Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Advanced Systems and Concepts Office, DTRA01-03-D-0017.  Filed January 31, 2006.  Available from: http://www.dtra.mil/asco/DTRAFinalInfluenzaReport.pdf.

Guest Editor of Special Issues of Peer-Reviewed Journals

  1. Cole, H.M., Markel, H. “The University of Michigan Medical School Sesquicentennial Issue”. Journal of the American Medical Association.  2000; 283 (7): 833-956.
  2. Stern, A.M., Cetron, M.S., Markel, H. “The 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic in the United States: Lessons Learned and Challenges Exposed.”  (Special Issue).  Public Health Reports (Volume 125, Supplement no. 3, 2010).

Books Co-Edited  for University of Michigan Press – Conversations in Medicine Series

  1. Lindee, S., Nelkin, D.: The DNA Mystique: The Gene as Cultural Icon, 2nd ed., 2004.
  2. Lowenstein, J.: The Midnight Meal and Other Essays about Doctors, Patients and Medicine, expanded edition, 2005.
  3. Mayes, R.: Universal Coverage: The Elusive Quest for National Health Insurance, paperback edition, 2005.
  4. Rosner, D., Markowitz, G.: Deadly Dust: Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Health in Twentieth Century America, new and expanded edition, 2006.
  5. Gilsdorf, J. Inside/Outside: A Physician’s Journey with Breast Cancer, 2006.
  6. Mullan, F.: White Coat, Clenched Fist: The Political Education of an American Physician.  New and expanded edition, 2006.
  7. Conway, K.: Ordinary Life, paperback edition, 2007.
  8. Conway, K.: Limits and the Illness of Expression, 2007.
  9. Prescott, H.M.: College Bodies: The History of College and University Health in America,  2007.
  10. Palmer, S.: Launching Global Health: The Caribbean Odyssey of the Rockefeller Foundation,  2010.

 

Book on Tape

  1. Markel, H., Oski, F.A.: The H.L. Mencken Baby Book (Narrated by Grover Gardner).  Newport Beach, California: Books on Tape, Inc. (Book #2865), 1991.

 

 

 

 

Dissertation

  1. Markel, H.:  Layers of Separation: Epidemics and the Quarantining of East European Jews in New York City During the Late 19th Century. The Johns Hopkins University, Ph.D., 1994. University Microfilms: Ann Arbor, 1994.

 

Publications – Articles (Peer-Reviewed Journals)

  1. Victery, W., Vander, A.J., Markel, H., Katzman, L., Shulak, J.M., Germain, C.:  Lead Exposure, Begun in Utero, Decreases Renin and Angiotensin II in Adult Rats. Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine 1982; 170:63-67.
  2. Markel, H.:  Charles Dickens and the Art of Medicine. Annals of Internal Medicine 1984; 101:408-411.
  3. Markel, H.:  The Childhood Suffering of Charles Dickens and his Literary Children. Pharos 1985; 48:5-8.
  4. Markel, H.:  In Defense of the Pickwickian Syndrome. Henry Ford Hospital Medical Journal 1985; 33:24-26.
  5. Markel, H., Rocchini, A.P., Beekman, R.H., Martin, J., Palmisano, J., Moorehead, C., Rosenthal, A.:  Exercise-Induced Hypertension after Repair of Coarctation of the Aorta:  Arm Versus Leg Exercise. Journal of the American College of Cardiology 1986; 8:165-171.
  6. Markel, H.:  When It Rains It Pours: Endemic Goiter, Iodized Salt, and David Murray Cowie, M.D. American Journal of Public Health 1987; 77:219-229.
  7. Markel, H.:  The Death of Samuel Johnson, L.L.D. A Clinico-Pathologic Conference. American Journal of Medicine 1987; 82:1203-1207.
  8. Markel, H.:  Fever of Unknown Origin, Weight Loss, and Hepatomegaly in a 3 year-old Boy (Clinical Conference). Journal of Pediatrics 1988; 112:308-313.
  9. Casella, J.F., Lewis, J.H., Bontempo, F.A., Zitelli, B.J., Markel, H., Starzl, T.E.:  Successful Treatment of Homozygous Protein C Deficiency by Hepatic Transplantation. Lancet 1988; 1:435-438.
  10. Markel, H.:  What You Ought to Know About Your Baby.  Menckeniana 1989; 111:7-13.
  11. Markel, H.:  Cleopatra’s Syndrome:  Blaming the Bearer of Bad News. Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants 1991; 4:669-670.
  12. Markel, H.:  The Stigma of Disease: Implications of Genetic Screening. American Journal of Medicine 1992; 93:209-215.
  13. Markel, H.:  Cholera, Quarantines, and Immigration Restriction: The View from Johns Hopkins, 1892. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1993; 67:691-695.
  14. Markel, H., Lee, A., Holmes, R.D., Domino, E.:  LSD Flashback Syndrome Exacerbated by Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Adolescents. Journal of Pediatrics 1994; 125:817-819.
  15. Markel, H.:  The Genesis of the Iron Lung: Philip Drinker, Charles F. McKhann, and James L. Wilson, and Early Attempts at Artificial Respiration for Poliomyelitis. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 1994; 148:1174-1180.
  16. Markel, H.:  A Gate to the City: The Baltimore Quarantine Station, 1918-1928. Public Health Reports 1995; 110:218-219.
  17. Markel, H.:  Orphanages Revisited: Some Historical Perspectives on Dependent, Abandoned and Orphaned Children in America. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 1995; 149:609-610.
  18. Markel, H.:  “Knocking Out the Cholera”: Cholera, Public Health, Quarantines, and Politics in New York City of 1892. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1995; 69:420-457.
  19. Markel, H.:  Academic Pediatrics: The View from New York City a Century Ago. Academic Medicine 1996; 71:146-151.
  20. Markel, H.:  Henry Koplik, M.D., the Good Samaritan Dispensary of New York City, and the Description of Koplik’s Spots. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 1996; 150:535-539.
  21. Tunnessen, W.W., Markel, H.:  Measles.  Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 1996, 150:547-548. (Also appeared as: Tunnessen, W.W., Markel, H.: Clinical Picture. Archives of Family Medicine 1997; 6:15-16).
  22. Markel, H.:  Di Goldene Medina (the Golden Land): Historical Perspectives of Eugenics and the East European (Ashkenazi) Jewish-American Community, 1880-1925. Health Matrix: Journal of Law and Medicine 1997; 7:49-64.
  23. Markel, H.:  Scientific Advances and Social Risks: Historical Perspectives of Genetic Screening Programs for Sickle Cell Disease, Tay-Sachs Disease, Neural Tube Defects, and Down Syndrome, 1970-1997. In: Holtzman, N.A., Watson, M.S. (eds.): Promoting Safe and Effective Genetic Testing in the United States.  Final Report of the Task Force on Genetic Screening (Bethesda, Maryland: NIH-DOE Working Group on Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Human Genome Research, October 30, 1997), Appendix VI: 161-176.
  24. Markel, H.:  Caring for the Foreign-Born: The Health of Immigrant Children in the United States, 1890-1925. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 1998; 152:1020-1027.
  25. Stern, A.M., Markel, H.:  All Quiet on the Third Coast: Medical Inspections of Immigrants in Michigan, 1881-1935. Public Health Reports 1999; 114(2):178-182.
  26. Markel, H.:  When Germs Travel: Immigration and the Public Health in American History. The American Scholar 1999; 68:61-69.
  27. Markel, H., Stern, A.M.:  Which Face? Whose Nation? Immigration, Public Health, and the Construction of Disease at America’s Ports and Borders, 1891-1928. American Behavioral Scientist 1999; 42(9):1314-1331.
  28. Markel, H.: Charles Dickens’ Work to Help Establish the Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital of London. The Lancet 1999; 354:673-675.
  29. Markel, H.:  Victor C. Vaughan. Journal of the American Medical Association 2000; 283(7):848.
  30. Markel, H.: University of Michigan Medical School, 1850-2000.  Journal of the American Medical Association 2000; 283(7):915-920.
  31. Lambert, S.M., Markel, H.:  Making History: Thomas Francis, Jr. and the 1954 Salk Poliomyelitis Vaccine Field Trial. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 2000; 154:512-517.
  32. Markel, H.:  For the Welfare of Children: The Origins of the Partnership Between Public Health Workers and Pediatricians in the United States. American Journal of Public Health 2000; 90(6):893-899.
  33. Markel, H.:  Blowing the Whistle: The Internship of William Carlos Williams, M.D. and his    Abrupt Resignation from the New York Nursery and Child’s Hospital. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 2000; 154:952-955.
  34. Markel, H.:  “The Eyes Have It”: The Role of Trachoma in the American Jewish Immigration Experience, 1897-1924. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 2000(3); 74:525-560.
  35. Markel, H.:  Medicine and the Arts: The Autobiography of William Carlos Williams.  Academic Medicine 2001; 76:48-49.
  36. Markel, H.:  Journals of the Plague Years: Documenting the History of the AIDS Epidemic.  American Journal of Public Health 2001; 91:1025-1028.
  37. Markel, H.:  Reflections on Sinclair Lewis’s “Arrowsmith”: The Great American Novel of Public Health and Medicine. Public Health Reports 2001; 116:371-375.
  38. Markel, H.:  History Matters: Why History is of Importance to Academic Pediatricians in the 21st Century. Journal of Pediatrics 2001; 139:471-472.
  39. Markel, H., Stern, A. M.:  The Foreignness of Germs: The Persistent Association of Immigrants and Disease in American Society. The Milbank Quarterly 2002; 80:757-788.
  40. Markel, H.:  The 36-Hour Day: A Wary Commentary on the New Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Guidelines on Resident Duty Hours. Pediatrics 2003; 111:1107-1108.
  41. Stern, A. M., Markel, H.:  The Public Health Service and Film Noir: A Look Back at Elia Kazan’s Panic in the Streets (1950). Public Health Reports 2003; 118:178-183.
  42. Stern, A.M., Markel, H.:  A Historical Perspective on the Changing Contours of Medical Residency Programs. Journal of Pediatrics 2004; 144:1-2.
  43. Markel, H.:  Becoming a Physician: “I Swear By Apollo” – On Taking the Hippocratic Oath (Perspective).  New England Journal of Medicine 2004; 350:2026-2029.
  44. Markel, H., Golden, J.:  Children’s Public Health Policy in the United States: How the Past Can Inform the Future.  Health Affairs 2004; 23:147-152.
  45. Stern, A.M., Markel, H.: International Efforts to Control Infectious Diseases, 1851 to the Present. Journal of the American Medical Association 2004; 292:1474-1480.
  46. Markel, H.: “Who’s on First?” Medical Discoveries and Scientific Priority (Perspective). New England Journal of Medicine 2004; 351:2792-2794.
  47. Gostin, L., Gravely, S., Shakman, S., Markel, H., Cetron, M.: Quarantine: Voluntary or Not? The Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics (Special Supplement. The Public’s Health and the Law in the 21st Century: The Proceedings of the 3rd Annual Partnership Conference on Public Health Law) 2004; 32:83-86.
  48. Allan, S., Loue, S., Markel, H., Scott, C., Wasserman, M.:  Interdisciplinary Contributions to Public Health Law. The Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics (Special Supplement. The Public’s Health and the Law in the 21st Century: The Proceedings of the 3rd Annual Partnership Conference on Public Health Law) 2004; 32:92-96.
  49. Markel, H.: The Accidental Addict (Perspective). New England Journal of Medicine 2005; 352:966-968.
  50. Markel, H.: April 12, 1955: Tommy Francis and the Salk Vaccine (Perspective). New England Journal of Medicine 2005; 352(14):1408-1410.
  51. Golden, J., Markel, H.:  Successes and Missed Opportunities in Protecting Our Children’s Health: Critical Junctures in the History of Children’s Health Policy in the United States. Pediatrics 2005 (Supp.); 115:1129-1135.
  52. Stern, A.M., Markel, H.:  The History of Vaccines and Immunization: Familiar Patterns, New Challenges. Health Affairs 2005; 24:1-11.
  53. Markel, H., Lichter, A.:  University of Michigan Medical School. (Cover Note.) Academic Medicine 2005; 80:557.
  54. Markel, H.:  The Search for Effective HIV Vaccines (Perspective). New England Journal of Medicine 2005; 353:753-757.
  55. Markel, H.:  Just Fading Away? The Closing of Walter Reed (Perspective). New England Journal of Medicine 2005; 353:1764-1766.
  56. Markel, H.:  Why America Needs a Strong FDA (Commentary). Journal of the American Medical Association 2005; 294:2489-2491.
  57. Markel, H.:  The Medical Detectives (Perspective). New England Journal of Medicine 2005; 353:2426-2428.
  58. Markel, H.:  The Stethoscope and the Art of Listening (Perspective). New England Journal of Medicine 2006; 354:551-553.
  59. Markel, H.:  Dr. Osler’s Relapsing Fever (Commentary).  Journal of the American Medical Association 2006; 295:2886-2887.
  60. Markel, H., Stern, AM., Navarro, J.A., Michalsen, J.R., Monto, A.S., Digiovanni, C.: Nonpharmaceutical Influenza Mitigation Strategies, U.S. Communities, 1918-1920 Pandemic. Emerging Infectious Diseases 2006; 12 (12): 1957-1960. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/eid.
  61. Golden, J., Markel, H.:  A Historically Based Thought Experiment: Meeting New Challenges for Children’s Health and Well-Being.  Health Affairs 2007;26(2):445-449.
  62. Markel, H.:  Public Health and the Public’s Fascination with Epidemics:  Contagious Narratives.  (Literatim).  Journal of the American Medical Association 2007; 297(20):2292-2294.
  63. Markel, H.:  Getting the Lead Out: The Rhode Island Lead Paint Trials and its Impact on Children’s Health. Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2007; 297:2773-2775.
  64. Markel, H., Gostin, L.O., Fidler, D.:  Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis:  An Isolation Order, Public Health Powers, and a Global Crisis. (Commentary) Journal of the American Medical Association 2007; 298:83-86.
  65. Markel, H.:  Contemplating Pandemics:  The Role of Historical Inquiry in Developing Pandemic Mitigation Strategies for the 21st Century.  Ethical and Legal Considerations in Mitigating Pandemic Disease.  Forum on Microbial Threats, Board on Global Health.  Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. National Academies Press, Washington DC 2007:44-60.
  66. Markel, H., Lipman, H.B., Navarro, J.A., Michalsen, J.R., Sloan, A., Stern, A.M., Cetron, M.S.:  Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Implemented by 43 U.S. Cities during the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic. Journal of the American Medical Association, 2007; 298 (6):644-654.
  67. Markel, H.:  Gotta’ Sing! Gotta’ Diagnose!:  A Postmortem Examination of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Medical Musical Allegro. Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2007; 298 (13):1575-1577.
  68. Fidler, D., Gostin, L., Markel, H.:  Through the Quarantine Looking Glass: Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Public Health Governance, Law and Ethics.  The Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 2007; Winter, 616-628.
  69. Markel, H.: Exploring the Dangerous Trades with Dr. Alice Hamilton. Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2007; 298 (23):2802-2804.
  70. Markel, H., Stern, A.M., Cetron, M.S.:  Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Employed by Major American Cities During the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.  Transactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association Vol. 119, 2008:129-142.
  71. Markel, H.:  The House of God: 30 Years Later. Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2008; 299 (2):227-229.
  72. Markel, H.:  The Principles and Practice of Medicine: How a Textbook, a Former Baptist Minister, and an Oil Tycoon Shaped the Modern American Medical and Public Health Industrial-Research Complex.  Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2008; 299 (10): 1199-1201.
  73. Markel, H.:  The Billy Goat War: Morris Fishbein and the AMA’s Crusade Against America’s Consummate Quack, John Brinkley. Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2008; 299 (18):2217-2219.
  74. Markel, H., Stern, A.:  Presidential Health and the Public’s Need to Know. Journal of the American Medical Association (Commentary) 2008; 299 (21):2558-2560.
  75. Markel, H., Gostin, L.O.:  Exposing Poverty and Inspiring Medical Humanitarianism. (Commentary)  Journal of the American Medical Association. 2008; 300 (2):209-211.
  76. Markel, H.:  Not So Great Moments:  The “Discovery” of Ether Anesthesia and its “Re-Discovery” by Hollywood. Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2008; 300 (18):2188-2190.
  77. Stern, A.M and Markel, H.:  Disease Etiology and Political Ideology:  Revisiting Erwin H. Ackerknecht’s Classic 1948 Essay, “Anticontagionism between 1821 and 1867”. International Journal of Epidemiology (Commentary) 2009; 38 (1):31-33.
  78. Markel, H.:  The Last Alcoholic Days of F. Scott Fitzgerald.  Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2009; 301 (18):1939-1940.
  79. Markel, H.:  Physician, Heal Thyself:  Arthur Miller, Henrik Ibsen, and the Enemies of the People. Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2009; 301 (23):2506-2507.
  80. Markel, H.:  Experiments and Observations:  How William Beaumont and Alexis St. Martin Seized the Moment of Scientific Progress.  Journal of the American Medical Association (Literatim) 2009; 302 (7):804-806.
  81. Stern A.M., Markel, H.:  What Mexico Taught the World about Pandemic Influenza Preparedness and Community Mitigation Strategies.  Journal of the American Medical Association. (Commentary) 2009; 302 (11):1221-1222.
  82. Stern, A.M., Cetron, M.S., Markel, H.:  Closing the Schools: Lessons from the 1918-19 U.S. Influenza Pandemic.  Health Affairs. (Web exclusive.  September 29, 2009). [2009;28(6):w1066-78 (published online 29 September 2009; 10.1377/ hlthaff.28.6.w1066)]
  83. Markel, H.: Men in White: The Operating Room’s Debut Into Popular American Culture.  Journal of the American Medical Association. (Literatim) 2009; 302 (21):2376-2378.
  84. Markel, H.: King Tutankhamen, Modern Medical Science, and the Expanding Boundaries of Historical Inquiry. Journal of the American Medical Association. (Invited Editorial). 2010; 303 (7): 667-668.
  85. Markel, H.:  Abraham Flexner and His Remarkable Report on Medical Education: A Century Later. Journal of the American Medical Association. (Literatim). 2010; 303 (9): 888-890.
  86. Vukotich, C.J., Coulborn, R.M., Aragon, T.J., Baker, M.G., Burrus, B.B., Cowling, B.J., Duncan, A., Enanoria, W., Fabian, M.P., Ferng, Y.-H., Larson, E.L., Leung, G.M., Markel, H., Milton, D.K., Monto, A.S., Morse, S.S., Navarro, J.A., Park, S.Y., Priest, P., Stebbins, S., Stern, A.M., Uddin, M., Wetterhall, S.F., Aiello, A.E.: Findings, Gaps and Future Direction for Research in Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions for Pandemic Influenza [conference summary].  Emerging Infectious Diseases [serial on the Internet]. 2010;16 (4): www.cdc.gov/EID/content/16/4/e2.htm
  87. Markel, H.  Grasping at Straws: Eugene O’Neill, Tuberculosis, and Transformation. Journal of the American Medical Association. (Literatim).  2010; 303 (13): 1316-1317.
  88. Stern, A.M., Cetron, M.S., Markel, H.  The 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic in the United States: Lessons Learned and Challenges Exposed. (Guest Editorial). Public Health Reports. 2010; 125 (Supplement 3): 6-8.
  89. Stern, A.M., Reilly, M.B, Cetron, M.S., Markel, H.:  “Better Off in School”:  School Medical Inspection as a Public Health Strategy During the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic in the United States.  Public Health Reports. 2010; 125 (Supplement 3): 63-70.
  90. Aiello, A.E., Coulborn, R.M., Aragon, T.J., Baker, M.G., Burrus, B.B., Cowling, B.J., Duncan, A., Enanoria, W., Fabian, M.P., Ferng, Y.-H., Larson, E.L., Leung, G.M., Markel, H., Milton, D.K., Monto, A.S., Morse, S.S., Navarro, J.A., Park, S.Y., Priest, P., Stebbins, S., Stern, A.M., Uddin, M., Wetterhall, S.F., Vukotich, C.J.: Research Findings from Non-Pharmaceutical Intervention Studies for Pandemic Influenza and Current Gaps in the Research. (Major Article). American Journal of Infection Control, 2010; 38 (4): 251-258.
  91. Fox, D.M., Markel, H.: Is History Relevant to Implementing Health Reform?   Journal of the American Medical Association.  (Commentary).  2010; 303 (17): 1749-1750.
  92. Markel, H.  “Calling Dr. Kildare”: The Literary Lives of Frederick Schiller Faust, a.k.a Max Brand.  Journal of the American Medical Association. (Literatim). 2010: 304 (13): 1501-1502.
  93. Markel, H.  Cole Porter’s Eventful Nights and Days.  Journal of the American Medical Association. (Literatim). 2011; 305 (3): 310-311.
  94. Stern, A.M., Koreck, M.T., Markel, H.: Assessing Argentina’s Response to H1N1 in Austral Winter 2009: Presidential Lethargy and Local Ingenuity. Public Health Reports. 2011; 126 (1): 9-12.
  95. Markel, H.: Über Coca: Sigmund Freud, Carl Koller, and Cocaine. Journal of the American Medical Association. (Literatim). 2011; 305 (13): 1360-1361.
  96. Markel, H.: John Harvey Kellogg and the Pursuit of Wellness. Journal of the American Medical Association. (Literatim). 2011; 305 (17): 1814-1815.
  97. Markel, H.:  The Extraordinary Dr. Biggs. Journal of the American Medical Association.  (Literatim). 2011; 305 (23):2473-2474.
  98. Markel, H.:  Onward Howard Kelly, Marching as to War. Journal of the American Medical Association. (Literatim). 2011: 306: 2514-2515.
  99. Taubenberger, J.K, Baltimore, D., Doherty, P.C., Markel, H., Morens, D.M., Wilson, I.A.:  Reconstruction of the 1918 Influenza Virus: Unexpected Rewards from the Past. mBio. 2012; 3(5): e00201-12. doi:10.1128/mBio.00201-12.
  100. Sarntivijai, S., Zuoshuang, X., Ade, A.S., Markel, H., Omenn, G.S., Athey, B.O., He, Y.: Ontology-Based Combinational Analysis of Adverse Events Associated with Killed and Live Influenza Vaccines. PLoS ONE. 2012; 7(11):e49941.doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0049941
  101. Markel, H.:  Happy 200th Birthday Dr. Snow. (A Piece of My Mind).  Journal of the American Medical Association. 2013; 309 (10): 995-996.
  102. Markel, H.:  Patents, Profits, and the American People. The Bayh-Dole Act of 1980. New England Journal of Medicine. (Perspective). 2013; 369 (9): 794-796.
  103. Markel, H.:  Worldly Approaches to Global Health Policies:  1851 to the Present. Public Health. (The Journal of the Royal Society of Health, U.K.). 2014; 128 (2): 124-128.
  104. Markel, H.:  Gouttes de Lait and The Milbank Quarterly. The Milbank Quarterly. 2014; 92(1):1-6. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  105. Markel, H.:  Opposite the Editorial Page: Introducing a New Feature to the Milbank Quarterly. The Milbank Quarterly. 2014; 92(2):167-172. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  106. Markel, H.:  A Grain of Salt. The Milbank Quarterly. 2014; 92(3): 407-412. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  107. Markel, H.:  Ebola Fever and Global Health Responsibilities. The Milbank Quarterly. 2014; 92(4): 633-639. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  108. Markel, H.:  Give ‘Em Health, Harry. The Milbank Quarterly. 2015; 93(1): 1-7. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  109. Davis, B.M., Markel, H., Navarro, J.A., Wells, E., Monto, A.S., Aiello, A.E.: The Effect of Reactive School Closure on Community Influenza-Like Illness Counts in the State of Michigan During the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic. Clinical Infectious Diseases. (2015) First published online: April 20, 2015. (Major Article). doi: 10.1093/cid/civ182.
  110. Markel, H.:  Koplik’s Spots:  The Harbinger of Measles Epidemic. The Milbank Quarterly. 2015; 93(2): 223-229. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  111. Markel, H.:  Wash Your Hands!. The Milbank Quarterly. 2015; 93(3): 447-454. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  112. Markel, H.:  Last Call. The Milbank Quarterly. 2015; 93(4): 651-658. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  113. Markel, H.:  Department of Corrections. The Milbank Quarterly. 2016; 94(1): 5-12. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  114. Navarro, J.A., Cetron, M.S., Kohl, Katrin, Markel, H.:  A Tale of Many Cities:  A Contemporary Historical Study of the Implementation of School Closures During the 2009 pA (H1N1) Influenza Pandemic. Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law. 2016; 41(3): 393-421.
  115. Markel, H.: “Public Health is Purchasable.” The Milbank Quarterly. 2016; 94(3): 441-447. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  116. Markel, H.:  “Neglected.” The Milbank Quarterly. 2016; 94(4): 699-703. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  117. Markel, H.:  “Infrastructure.” The Milbank Quarterly. 2017: 95(1): 5-10. (From the Editor-in-Chief).
  118. Markel, H.: “Requiem David Willis, 1930-2017.” The Milbank Quarterly. 2017: 95(2): 217-223. (From the Editor-in-Chief).

 

Book Chapters, Peer-Reviewed

  1. Markel, H.:  Charles Dickens and the Art of Medicine. In: Carmichael, A.G., Ratzan, R.M. (eds.):  Medicine: A Treasury of Art and Literature (New York, Hugh Lauter Levin Associates/Macmillan, 1991), pp.203-204.
  2. Markel, H.:  Cholera. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 1995), p.219.
  3. Markel, H.:  Diphtheria. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 1995), p.334.
  4. Markel, H.:  Influenza. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 1995), p.588.
  5. Markel, H.:  Poliomyelitis. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 1995), p.913.
  6. Markel, H.:  T. Mitchell Prudden, M.D. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 1995), p.949.
  7. Markel, H.:  Small Pox. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 1995), pp.1078-1079.
  8. Markel, H.:  Tuberculosis. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 1995), p.1202.
  9. Markel, H.:  Yellow Fever. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.):  The Encyclopedia of New York City (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 1995), p.1280.
  10. Markel, H.:  When it Rains it Pours:  Endemic Goiter, Iodized Salt and David Murray Cowie, M.D. In: Markel, H., Tarolli, J. (eds.): Caring for Children: A Celebration of the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan (Historical Center for the Health Sciences Monographs, no. 5, Ann Arbor, 1998), pp.37-68.
  11. Markel, H.:  The Genesis of the Iron Lung: Philip Drinker, Charles F. McKhann, James L. Wilson, and Early Attempts at Administering Artificial Respiration to Patients with Poliomyelitis. In: Markel, H., Tarolli, J. (eds.):  Caring for Children: A Celebration of the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan (Historical Center for the Health Sciences Monographs, no. 5, Ann Arbor, 1998), pp.75-92.
  12. Markel, H.:  Hermann Michael Biggs. In: Garraty, J.A., Carnes, M.C. (eds.):  American National Biography (New York, Oxford University Press, 1999), 2: pp.759-760.
  13. Markel, H.:  George Frederick Dick.  In: Garraty, J.A., Carnes, M.C. (eds.):  American National Biography (New York, Oxford University Press, 1999), 6: pp.547-548.
  14. Markel, H.:  John Howland. In: Garraty, J.A., Carnes, M.C. (eds.):  American National Biography (New York, Oxford University Press, 1999), 11: pp.364-365.
  15. Markel, H.:  Henry Koplik. In: Garraty, J.A., Carnes, M.C. (eds.): American National Biography (New York, Oxford University Press, 1999), 12: pp.880-881.
  16. Markel, H.:  Foreword. In: Davenport, H.W.:  Not Just Any Medical School: The Science, Practice, and Teaching of Medicine at the University of Michigan 1850-1941 (Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 1999), pp.v-vii.
  17. Meehan, C., Markel, H.:  Cholera, Historical. In: Lederberg, J., Alexander, M., Bloom, B.R. (eds.):  The Encyclopedia of Microbiology, Second Edition, Volume I (New York, Academic Press, 2000), pp.801-808.
  18. Markel, H., Stern, A.M.:  Which Face? Whose Nation? Immigration, Public Health, and the Construction of Disease at America’s Ports and Borders, 1891-1928. In: Foner, N., Rumbaut, R., Gold, S. (eds.): Immigration Research For a New Century: Multidisciplinary Perspectives (New York, Russell Sage Foundation, 2000), pp.93-112.
  19. Markel, H.:  When Germs Travel. In:  Eisenberg, N., Weiner, H., (eds.):  The Questioning Reader (Needham Heights, Allyn and Bacon, 2000), pp.553-563.
  20. Markel, H.:  Prescribing Arrowsmith.  In: Lewis, S.:  Arrowsmith.  (New York, Gryphon Press/Classics of Medicine Series, 2001), pp.1-6.
  21. Markel, H.:  Cholera. In: Boyer, P.S., Dubofsky, M. (eds.):  The Oxford Companion to United States History (New York, Oxford University Press, 2001), p.118.
  22. Markel, H.:  The Autobiography of William Carlos Williams. In:  Dittrich, L.R. (ed.):  Ten Years of Medicine and the Arts: 100 Selections from Academic Medicine, 1991-2001 (Washington, D.C., Association of American Medical Colleges, 2001), pp.20-21.
  23. Stern, A.M., Markel, H.:  Introduction. In: Stern, A.M., Markel, H. (eds.):  Formative Years:  Children’s Health in the United States, 1880-2000 (Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2002), pp.1-22.
  24. Markel, H.:  For the Welfare of Children. The Origins of the Relationship between U.S. Public Health Workers and Pediatricians. In: Stern, A.M., Markel, H. (eds.):  Formative Years: Children’s Health in the United States, 1880-2000 (Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2002), pp.47-65.
  25. Markel, H.:  For some, Marijuana Grows Mean. In:  Dekorne, C., Bergsma, L., Doba, S., eds., Anti-Drug Education With the New York Times: Focus on Marijuana.  A Unit for Middle and High School Educators.  (New York, The New York Times Newspaper in Education Program/Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2003), pp.5-11.  (www.nytimes.com/learning/teachers/NIE/focus on Marijuana).
  26. Markel, H.:  Who Says You Have to Crawl Before You Walk? Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Crawling, and Medical History.  In: Duffin, J., ed., Clio in the Clinic: History in Medical Practice (Toronto, University of Toronto Press, 2005), pp.146-160.
  27. Markel, H., Stern, A.M.:  Foreword.  In: Lowenstein, J.:  The Midnight Meal and Other Essays About Doctors, Patients and Medicine, new and expanded edition (Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2005). pp.xi-xiii.
  28. Markel, H., Stern, A.M.:  Foreword.  In: Rosner, D., Markowitz, G., Deadly Dust:  Silicosis and the Politics of Occupational Health in Twentieth Century America, new and expanded edition (Ann Arbor, University of Michigan Press, 2006). pp.vii-viii.
  29. Markel, H.:  Diagnosis:  Supersize.  In:  Long, Elizabeth Cloninger, ed., Sentence Resources for Writers with Readings (New York, Pearson Longman, 2006), pp.761-765.
  30. Markel, H.:  Caring for the Foreign-Born. The Health of Immigrant Children in the United States, 1890-1925.  In: Warsh, C.K., Strong-Boag, V., editors.  Children’s Health Issues in Historical Perspective (Waterloo, ON, Canada, Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2005), pp.209-226.
  31. Markel, H.:  Commentary on “Mental Examination of Immigrants: Administration and Line Inspection at Ellis Island (1917),” by E.H. Mullan.  In:  Rinsky, Robert A., ed., Public Health Reports:  History Collection, 1878-2005 (Washington D.C., Association of Schools of Public Health, 2005), pp.92-102.
  32. Markel, H.:  A Global Epidemic in the Making?  In: Lamm, R., Everett, J., eds. Dynamic Argument.  (Boston, Houghton-Mifflin Co., 2007).
  33. Stern, A.M., Markel, H.: Influenza Pandemic.  In: From Birth to Death and Bench to Clinic:  The Hastings Center Bioethics Briefing Book for Journalists, Policymakers, and Campaigns (Washington, D.C., The Hastings Center, 2008), pp.89-92.
  34. Markel, H., Potts, S.  “Beyond Plain Text:  Op-Chart-American Epidemics, a Brief History”.  IN: Linden, T., editor.  The New York Times Reader: Health and Medicine.  (Washington D.C.: CQ Press, 2010), pp. 284-286.
  35. Markel, H.:  Cholera. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society,  2010), p. 245.
  36. Markel, H.:  Diphtheria. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 2010), p. 367.
  37. Markel, H.:  Influenza. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 2010), p. 646.
  38. Markel, H.:  Poliomyelitis. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 2010), p. 1011.
  39. Markel, H.:  T. Mitchell Prudden, M.D. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 2010), p. 1046.
  40. Markel, H.:  Small Pox. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 2010), p. 1193.
  41. Markel, H.:  Tuberculosis. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.): The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 2010), pp.1337-1338.
  42. Markel, H.:  Yellow Fever. In: Jackson, K.T. (ed.):  The Encyclopedia of New York City: Second Edition (New Haven, Yale University Press in association with the New-York Historical Society, 2010), p. 1424.
  43. Markel, H., Stern, A. M.:  The Foreignness of Germs: The Persistent Association of Immigrants and Disease in American Society. In: Spickard, Paul. (ed.), Race and Immigration in the United States  (New York, Routledge, 2011), pp. 203-229.
  44. Stern, A.M., Markel, H.: International Efforts to Control Infectious Disease, 1851 to the Present. In: Thomas, N. (ed.): Health Security and Governance, Vol. 3 (New York: Routledge, 2012), pp.11-23.
  45. Fidler, D., Gostin, L.O., Markel, H.: Through the Quarantine Looking Glass: Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Public Health Governance, Law, and Ethics. In: Thomas, N. (ed.): Health Security and Governance, Vol. 4 (New York: Routledge, 2012), pp. 293-315.
  46. Markel, H.:  The Hippocratic Oath as an Example of Professional Conduct. In: DeAngelis, C.D. (ed.): Patient Care and Professionalism, (New York: Oxford University Press, 2014), pp. 19-30.

 

Publications – Book Reviews-Scholarly Literature

  1. Markel, H.: International Quarantines: A Review. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1991; 65:601-603.
  2. Markel, H.: The Social Costs of Genetic Welfare. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1992; 66:686-687.
  3. Markel, H.: Courage Under Siege: Starvation, Disease, and Death in Warsaw. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1993; 67:741-742.
  4. Markel, H.: Eugenics, Human Genetics and Human Failings. Journal of the History of Medicine 1994; 49:445-446.
  5. Markel, H.: The Popularization of Medicine, 1650-1850. Journal of General Internal Medicine 1995; 10:117-118.
  6. Markel, H.: Genetics and Medicine in the United States, 1800-1922. ISIS, Journal of the History of Science 1995; 86:335.
  7. Markel, H.: Education for Motherhood: Advice for Mothers in 20th Century Canada. Medical History 1995; 39:505-506.
  8. Markel, H.: Simon Baruch:  Rebel in the Ranks of Medicine, 1840-1921. Medical History 1996; 40:264-265.
  9. Markel, H.: Model Mothers: Jewish Mothers and Maternity Provision in East London, 1870-1939. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1996; 70:540-541.
  10. Markel, H.: A Summer Plague:  Polio and Its Survivors. Journal of the American Medical Association 1996; 275:251.
  11. Markel, H.: Hives of Sickness:  Public Health and Epidemics in New York City. Medical History 1996; 40:507-508.
  12. Markel, H.: Science and the Practice of Medicine in the 19th Century.  Technology and Culture 1996; 37:351-352.
  13. Markel, H.: The Machine in the Nursery: Incubator Technology and the Origins of Newborn Intensive Care. Medical History 1997; 41:392-393.
  14. Markel, H.: A Social History of Wet Nursing in America:  from Breast to Bottle. Medical History 1997; 41:393-394.
  15. Markel, H.: The Gospel of Germs: Men, Women and the Microbe in American Life. Journal of the American Medical Association 1998; 280:388.
  16. Markel, H.: Raising Baby by the Book:  The Education of American Mothers. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 1999; 73:518-519.
  17. Markel, H.: Contagion and Confinement: Controlling Tuberculosis Along the Skid Road.  Bulletin of the History of Medicine 2000; 74:414-415.
  18. Markel, H.: Rheumatic Fever in America and Britain.  A Biological, Epidemiological, and Medical History. Journal of American History 2000; 87:1057-1058.
  19. Markel, H.: In the Wake of the Plague:  The Black Death and the World it Made. New England Journal of Medicine 2002; 347:297-298.
  20. Markel, H.: “Don’t Kill Your Baby:” Public Health and the Decline of Breastfeeding in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Bulletin of the History of Medicine 2003; 77:215-217.
  21. Markel, H.: “Pox: An American History.” Journal of American History 2011; 98: 866.

 

Publications – Abstracts

  1. Victery, V., Vander, A.J., Markel, H., et al.:  Lead Decreases Renin and Angiotensin II Chronically in Rats. Federation Proceedings 1982; 41:1586.
  2. Scicli, A.G., Hayashi, H., Markel, H., Scicli, G., Carretero, O.A.:  Subcellular Distribution of Tonin and Kallikrein in the Submandibular Gland of the Rat. Proceedings of the 6th Scientific Meeting of the Inter-American Society of Hypertension, Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1983.
  3. Markel, H., Rocchini, A.P., et al.:  Mechanism of Exercise-Induced Hypertension after Successful Repair of Coarctation of the Aorta. 57th Annual Scientific Session of the American Heart Association, Circulation 1984; 70(4 Supplement II):131.
  4. Markel, H., Schalick, W.O.:  A Dialogue for Clinician-Historians. American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, Seattle, Washington, May 1, 1992.
  5. Markel, H., Schalick, W.O.:  Clinician-Historian’s Workshop. American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, Louisville, Kentucky, May 12, 1993.
  6. Markel, H.:  Layers of Separation: Cholera, Class, Quarantines, Politics and Public Health in New York City, 1892. American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, Louisville, Kentucky, May 16, 1993.
  7. Markel, H., Schalick, W.O.:  The Development of Professional Clinician-Historians.  National Meeting of MD-PhD Social Scientists, sponsored by the MacArthur Foundation and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts, April 8, 1994.
  8. Markel, H., Schalick, W.O.:  A Workshop for Clinician-Historians. American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, New York, New York, May 1, 1994.
  9. Markel, H.:  Averting a Pestilence: The Typhus Fever Epidemic of 1892 in New York City’s Lower East Side. American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, New York, New York, May 2, 1994.
  10. Boyle. J., Markel, H.:  An Historical Perspective of Tuberculosis in Michigan. 16th Annual Meeting of the Michigan Chapter, American College of Physicians, Flint, Michigan, May 6, 1994.
  11. Markel, H., Schalick, W.O.:  Improving Ties Between the AAHM and Historical Sections of Clinical Specialty Groups:  A Dialogue for Clinician-Historians. American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, May 1, 1995.
  12. Markel, H.:  American Health Care Providers and Foreign-Born Patients: Health Care Policies and Delivery for Russian Jewish, Chinese and Mexican Immigrants, 1965-present. Burroughs-Wellcome Fund 40th Anniversary Award Poster Session and Meeting, held at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine, Toronto, Canada, May 7, 1998.
  13. Markel, H.:  Trachoma and the Jewish American Immigration Experience, 1897-1924:  The View from New York Harbor, American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada, May 8, 1998.
  14. Markel, H.:  Trachoma and the Jewish American Immigration Experience, 1897-1924: The View from New York Harbor, Session of the American Jewish Historical Society, Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association, Washington District of Columbia, January 8, 1999.

 

Publications – Articles for the Non-Peer Reviewed Medical Literature

  1. Markel, H.:  Consumer Product Injury Prevention: Putting Research Into Practice. Pediatric Basics:  The Journal of Pediatric Nutrition and Development (The Gerber Company) 1996; Fall; 78:20.
  2. Markel, H.:  Ask the Expert Panel on Behavior: The Gifted Child. Contemporary Pediatrics 1997; 14(3):110.
  3. Markel, H.:  Ask the Expert Panel on Behavior: Critical Parents. Contemporary Pediatrics 1999; 16(1):48.
  4. Markel, H.:  Caring for the Foreign-Born: The Health of Immigrant Children in the United States, 1890-1925. In: Children and Families in an Era of Rapid Change, Creating a Shared Agenda for Researchers, Practitioners and Policy Makers.  Head Start’s Fourth National Research Conference.  Summary of Conference Proceedings.  (Washington, D.C.: Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services/Columbia University School of Public Health,  Center for Population and Family Health/Society for Research in Child Development, 1998), 51-56.
  5. Pascoe, J.M., Coll, C.G., Markel, H., Theilde Bocanegra, H.:  Immigration and Migration and Its Effects on Children and Their Communities. In: Children and Families in an Era of Rapid Change, Creating a Shared Agenda for Researchers, Practitioners and Policy Makers. Head Start’s Fourth National Research Conference. Summary of Conference Proceedings (Washington, D.C.: Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services/Columbia University School of Public Health, Center for Population and Family Health/Society for Research in Child Development, 1998), 177-189.
  6. Markel, H.:  Ask the Expert Panel on Behavior: Chronic Disease and Adolescence. Contemporary Pediatrics 1999; 16(9):33.
  7. Markel, H.:  When the Doctor Does Not Know the Answers to a Patient’s Questions. Medscape Pediatrics 2000; 2(1), June 12, 2000. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/408544.
  8. Markel, H.:  “An Example Worthy of Imitation”: University of Michigan Medical School, 1850-2000.  Medicine at Michigan 2000; (Fall):6-15 (Reprinted from JAMA 2000, 283:915-920).
  9. Markel, H.:  Ask the Expert Panel on Behavior: A Smoking Problem That Can’t Be Ignored. Contemporary Pediatrics 2002, 19(4):29.
  10. Pascoe, J., Markel, H., Shelov, S.:  Child Health Advice: Past and Present. In: Lamb-Parker, F., Hagen, J., Robinson, R., Rhee, H., eds. Head Start’s Sixth National Research Conference: The First Eight Years: Pathways to the Future.  Implications for Research, Policy, Practice. Summary of Conference Proceedings (New York: Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health under Contract No. 105-99-1520, 2003), 590-605.
  11. Stroufe, G., Hernandez, D.J., Markel, H., Smallwood, B.A.:  Meeting the Challenge and Opportunity of Diversity. In: Lamb-Parker, F., Hagen, J., Robinson, R., Rhee, H. (eds.): Head Start’s Sixth National Research Conference: The First Eight Years: Pathways to the Future.  Implications for Research, Policy, Practice. Summary of Conference Proceedings (New York: Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health under Contract No. 105-99-1520, 2003),  687-702.
  12. Markel, H.:  Lessons from the SARS Epidemic.  Medscape Pediatrics 2003; 5(1), May 20, 2003.  Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/455558.
  13. Markel, H.:  Fast Food, Obesity and Hospitals.  Medscape Pediatrics 2003; 5(2), posted July 15, 2003. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/458401. (Reprinted as: Take Bite Out of Obesity by Getting Fast Food Out of Hospitals, AAP News 2003 Dec;23(6):269).
  14. Markel, H.:  Pediatrics Perspective: Thanksgiving. Medscape Pediatrics 2003; 5(2), November 26, 2003. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/464868.
  15. Markel, H.:  That Growing Obesity Problem. Contemporary Pediatrics 2004 Jan; 21(1):30, 110.
  16. Markel, H.: Pediatrics Perspective:  Another New Year. Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(1),  January 7, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/466639.
  17. Markel, H.:  Ecstasy. Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(1), January 30, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/467419.
  18. Markel, H.:  Soft Drinks, Schools, and Obesity. Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(1), March 8, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/470344.
  19. Markel, H.:  Some Depressing News. Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(1), May 3, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/474577.
  20. Markel, H.:  Taking Shots: The Modern Miracle of Vaccines. (Feature article.)  Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(1), June 23, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/481059.
  21. Markel, H.:  The Painful Life of Cole Porter. Medscape General Medicine 2004; 6(2), June, 29, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/481410.
  22. Markel, H.:  Continuity of Care:  Relationship With a Former Patient. Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(2), August 17, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/487363.
  23. Markel, H.:  Whose Prescription Is It, Anyway? Attention Deficit Disorder and Ritalin. Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(2), September 16, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/488924.
  24. Markel, H.:  Should Physicians Be Prescribing Prayers? Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(2),  November 4, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/491362.
  25. Markel, H.:  Pediatrics Perspective: Father and Son. Medscape Pediatrics 2004; 6(2), December 15, 2004. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/495507.
  26. Markel, H.:  High Anxiety:  American Baby Care Advice Over the Past Century. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(1), January 20, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/497790.
  27. Markel, H.:  Why Doctors Have a Difficult Time Treating Obesity. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(1), March 8, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/499956.
  28. Markel, H.:  Child Healthcare in the 21st Century:  Relevance of Lessons Learned from Pediatrics and Public Health in the Late 19th and 20th Centuries. In: Lamb-Parker, F., Hagen, J., Jaspen, D., Lebrun, L., Robinson, R., Tamis-LeMonda, C., Baumwell, L., (eds.):  Head Start’s 7th National Research Conference, Promoting Positive Development in Young Children: Designing Strategies That Work. Summary of Conference Proceedings. (New York:  Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health, 2005), 299-304.
  29. Markel, H.:  Special Delivery. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(1), April 5, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/502005.
  30. Markel, H.:  Parents and Substance Abuse. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(1), May 10, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/503855.
  31. Markel, H.:  Postmortem. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(1), May 27, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.pediatrics/viewarticle/505017.
  32. Markel, H.:  Tobacco:  Our Biggest Public Health Foe. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(1), June 24, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.pediatrics/viewarticle/507010.
  33. Markel, H.:  The Sleepy Teenager. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(2), August 16, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.pediatrics/viewarticle/510242.
  34. Markel, H.:  A Bout of Flu. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(2), October 3, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.pediatrics/viewarticle/513587.
  35. Markel, H.:  Professor of Pediatrics. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(2), October 26, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.pediatrics/viewarticle/515201.
  36. Markel, H.:  To Treat or Not to Treat. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(2), December 21, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.pediatrics/viewarticle/517386.
  37. Markel, H.:  AIDS and the Global Village. Medscape Pediatrics 2005; 7(2), December 21, 2005. Available from: http://www.medscape.pediatrics/viewarticle/519967.
  38. Markel, H.:  Embryonic Stem Cells, Cloning, and the Power of Words (Public Health Perspective). Medscape Public Health and Prevention 2006; 4(1), March 9, 2006. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/522443.
  39. Markel, H.:  The Trouble with Asperger’s Syndrome. Medscape Pediatrics 2006; 8(1), April 13, 2006. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/529208.
  40. Markel, H.:  Rotavirus Vaccine: Costs and Benefits. Medscape Pediatrics 2006; 8(1), May 25, 2006. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/531827.
  41. Markel, H.:  Dying for a Drink: Alcohol on Campus. Medscape Pediatrics 2006; 4(1), June 7, 2006. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/533335.
  42. Markel, H.:  Happy (Belated) Birthday, Dr. Freud. Medscape Pediatrics 2006; 4(1), June 21, 2006. Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/535833.
  43. Markel, H.:  The New Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine. Medscape Pediatrics 2006; 8(2), July 27, 2006.
  44. Markel, H.:  Tales of the Bizarro World: The American Response to the Obesity Epidemic. Medscape Pediatrics. 2006; 8(2). Available from: http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/543514.

 

Publications – Letters to the Editor

  1. Markel, H., O’Neal, R.M., Vander, A.J., Noah, T., Zweifler, A., Hornback, B.G.:  Influence of the MCAT on the Premedical Curricula. Journal of the American Medical Association 1982; 247:2232-2233.
  2. Markel, H., McLean, R.H.:  Central Nervous System Involvement in Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome. Journal of Pediatrics 1989; 114:901-902.
  3. Markel, H.:  On Tiny Tim, Charles Dickens, and Pediatrics. American Journal of the Diseases of Children (The Pediatric Forum) 1993; 147:817-818.
  4. Markel, H.:  The AIDS Exception. The Atlantic Monthly 1997 (September):1-2.
  5. Markel, H.:  More on Mencken. Hopkins Medical News, 1999 (Spring/Summer); 22(3):5.
  6. Lichter, A.S., Markel, H., Morley, G.:  The Legacy of Udo Wilde. Medicine at Michigan 2002 (Summer):5-7.
  7. Markel, H.:  The Passing of a Giant. Horace W. Davenport, Ph.D. Medicine at Michigan 2005 (Fall):4-5.
  8. Markel, H., Gostin, L.O., Fidler, D.P.:  Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Public Health (Reply). Journal of the American Medical Association 2007; 298(16):1861-1862.
  9. Markel, H., Lipman, H.B, Navarro, J.A., Sloan, A., Michalsen, J.R., Stern, A.M., Cetron, M.S.:  Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Implemented during the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic (Reply).  Journal of the American Medical Association 2007; 298(19):2261.
  10. Markel, H.: The Merits of Vaccine.  The Atlantic Monthly. 2009 (December): 9-10.

 

Publications – Articles for the Lay Press

  1. Markel, H.: Sleepless Physicians Need an End to On-Call Shifts. The Washington Post (Health), September 26, 1989, p.6.
  2. Markel, H.: Cleopatra’s Syndrome: When Doctors Deliver Bad News. The Washington Post (Health), October 17, 1989, p.20.
  3. Markel, H.: Whooping Cough: Prevention is Worth the Risk. The Washington Post (Health), January 23, 1990, p.6.
  4. Markel, H.: Mencken Redux: Pretty Good Ruckus for 34 Years Dead. Baltimore Evening Sun (Op-Ed), February 5, 1990.
  5. Markel, H.: Pinning Down the Diaper Crisis. The Washington Post (Health), March 27, 1990, p. 6.
  6. Markel, H.: The Medical Waiting Game: When Long Delays are a Particular Hardship. The Washington Post (Health), May 1, 1990, p.6.
  7. Markel, H.: Parents’ Bookshelf: Answers to a Host of Questions. The Washington Post (Health), June 26, 1990, p.17.
  8. Markel, H.: A U.S. Agency Shuts the Gates on AIDS Victims. Baltimore Evening Sun (Op-Ed Essay), July 6, 1990, p.A13.
  9. Markel, H.: The Hospital the Menningers Built: A Medical Dynasty and Its Profound Influence on Psychiatry. The Washington Post (Health), September 18, 1990, p.20.
  10. Markel, H.: Opposition to Condoms is Shortsighted, Deadly: Calls for Chastity Won’t Work.   The Washington Post (Health), December 11, 1990, p.6.
  11. Markel, H.: New York City Acts for Public Health. Baltimore Evening Sun, March 1, 1991, p. A15.
  12. Markel, H.: Infant formula Ads Rankle Pediatricians:  The Advantages of Breast-Feeding. The Washington Post (Health), July 16, 1991, p.6.
  13. Markel, H.: Remembering Debby. Good Housekeeping, October 1991, pp.98-103.
  14. Huxtable, A.L., Markel, H.: Ghosts of Hope and Despair: Ellis Island’s Abandoned Hospitals are Crumbling Reminders of America’s Immigrant Story. The Wall Street Journal, December 9, 1999, p.A24.
  15. Markel, H.: Parsing the Ten Plagues:  Exodus 6:2-9:35. The Forward (Torah Portion), January 7, 2000, p.17.
  16. Markel, H.: Heal Thyself.  A study of the medical profession and what to do when you don’t believe your doctor. The New York Times Book Review, March 12, 2000, p.14.
  17. Markel, H.: Data Can’t Diagnose the Human Condition. The New York Times (Science Times), March 21, 2000, p.F7.
  18. Markel, H.: Growing Up on a Ritalin-Prozac Cocktail: Is this What Ricky Needs? The New York Times (Science Times), April 18, 2000, p.D6.
  19. Markel, H.: One Side Effect of Genetic Testing: Fear. The New York Times (Science Times), May 16, 2000, p.F8.
  20. Markel, H.: Anorexia Can Strike Boys, Too. The New York Times (Science Times), July 25, 2000, p.D7.
  21. Markel, H.: A Baby Works Her Magic on an Expert. The New York Times (Science Times), August 15, 2000, p.D8.
  22. Markel, H.: Patients are Discovering ‘My Doctor the Author’. The New York Times (Science Times), August 22, 2000, p.D7.
  23. Markel, H.: Lead Poisoning: The Silent Hazard Parents Overlook. Redbook, October 2000, pp. 214-223.
  24. Markel, H.: Prescribing Arrowsmith. The New York Times (Bookend), September 24, 2000, p.D8.
  25. Markel, H.: Easy Answer May Not Be the Right One. The New York Times (Science Times), October 24, 2000, p.D8.
  26. Markel, H.: “Averting a Pestilence”: The Typhus Fever Epidemic on New York’s Lower East Side, 1892. Pakn Treger, Fall 2000, pp.16-27.
  27. Markel, H.: The Number One Health Mistake Parents Make: Nothing Can Fill You With Dread Like A Soaring Fever.  Here’s How to Keep Your Cool. Redbook, December 2000, pp.154-160.
  28. Markel, H.: Those Magic Times When the Patient Makes the Doctor Feel Better. The New York Times (Science Times), November 28, 2000, p.D7.
  29. Markel, H.: The Pediatrician Parent. Morning Edition Radio Essay, National Public Radio, January 9, 2001. Available from:  http://www.npr.org/morning edition/01/09/2001.
  30. Markel, H.: Supply-Side Oncology.  Review of Dr. Folkman’s War: Angiogenesis and the Struggle to Defeat Cancer. The New York Times Book Review, February 4, 2001, p.4.
  31. Markel, H.: Brave New Worlds: “Utopia” and “Healing Waters.” Praxis Post, February 7, 2001. Available from:  http://praxispost.com/post/reviews/020701.
  32. Markel, H.: Eight Signs You Need a New Pediatrician. Redbook, March 2001, pp.158-160.
  33. Markel, H.: Dissecting Leonardo.  Book Review of Leonardo da Vinci by Sherwin Nuland.  Praxis Post, March 7, 2001. Available from:  http://praxis.md/post/reviews/030701.
  34. Markel, H.: Island of History.  Review: “From House Calls to Hospitals.” Praxis Post, April 18, 2001. Available from:  http://praxispost.com/post/reviews/041801.
  35. Markel, H.: And One Pill Makes You Small: On Fen-Phen and Dying to Be Thin. ELLE, May 2001, p.98.
  36. Kolata, G., Markel, H.: Babies Not Crawling? Reason Seems to Be Less Tummy Time. The New York Times (Page One News Article), Sunday, April 29, 2001, p.A1, p. A18.
  37. Markel, H.: Diagnosis, with Blood and Timing. The New York Times (Science Times), May 8, 2001, p.D7.
  38. Markel, H.: Doctors Now Need Well-Honed Skills in Job Hunting. The New York Times (Science Times), May 22, 2001, p.D5.
  39. Markel, H.: Learning to Treat, Not Judge. The New York Times (Science Times), July 17, 2001, p.D5.  (Reprinted as: The Danger of Labeling Patients. The International Herald Tribune, July 19, 2001, p. 10).
  40. Markel, H.: When the Doctor is Forced to Fire a Patient. The New York Times (Science Times), August 14, 2001, p.D6.
  41. Markel, H.: Patents Could Block the Way to a Cure. The New York Times (Op-Ed Essay), August 24, 2001, p.A21.
  42. Markel, H.: Growing Pains: Misnomer, But Still a Fact of Life. The New York Times (Science Times), August 28, 2001, p.D7.
  43. Markel, H.: Ritalin. Morning Edition Radio Essay, National Public Radio, October 11, 2001. Available from:  http://npr.org/programs/morning/archives.
  44. Markel, H.: Germ Culture: New Armies in the Never-Ending War. Harper’s Magazine, March 2002, pp.65-70.
  45. Markel, H.: Pediatrician by Day, Panicked Dad by Night. Child Magazine, March 2002, pp.53-54.
  46. Markel, H.: The Livable City. Seaport: New York History Magazine, Winter 2002, pp.38-39.
  47. Markel, H.: Diagnosis: Supersize. The New York Times (The Week in Review), March 24, 2002, p.4.
  48. Markel, H.: Learning to Heal. Morning Edition Radio Essay, National Public Radio, April 4, 2002. Available from:  http://npr.org/programs/morning/archives.
  49. Markel, H.: New Growth Charts Dispel the Myth That One Size Fits All. The New York Times (Science Times), April 16, 2002, p.D5.
  50. Markel, H.: For Some, Marijuana Grows Mean. The New York Times (Science Times), April 30, 2002, p.D5.
  51. Markel, H.: Doctors Learn in the Long Night Hours. The New York Times (Op-Ed Essay), June 19, 2002, p.A27.
  52. Markel, H.: “Fa(s)t Food.” Marketplace, Public Radio International, June 20, 2002. Available from:  http://www.marketplace.org/shows/2002/06/20_mpp.html.
  53. Markel, H.: A Conversation with Harold Shapiro: Weighing Medical Ethics for Many Years to Come. The New York Times (Science Times), July 2, 2002, p.D2.
  54. Markel, H.: A Global Epidemic in the Making. The Globalist (Global Health), August 11, 2002. Available from:  http://www.theglobalist.com/DBWeb/Storyid.aspx?storyID=2599.
  55. Markel, H.: From Eakins’s Canvas, 1800’s Version of Medical Docudrama. The New York Times (Science Times), August 13, 2002, p.D5.
  56. Markel, H.: Mixed Medical Messages: So What’s a Responsible Sun Worshiper to Do? The New York Times (The Week in Review), August 25, 2002, p.1.
  57. Markel, H.: The Global Path of the Mosquito. The Globalist, posted September 28, 2002. Available from: http://www.theglobalist.com. (Reprinted in Medscape Pediatrics 5(2), 2003, posted September 2, 2003.  Available from:  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/460407.
  58. Markel, H.: Ideas and Trends:  For Addicts, Relief May Be An Office Visit Away. The New York Times (The Week in Review), October 27, 2002, p.14.
  59. Markel, H.: “Have You Seen My Husband”:  The Problem Among East European Jewish   Families in America a Century Ago. Pakn Treger, Fall 2002, pp.10-20.
  60. Markel, H.: No Prescription for Antibiotics? No Problem. The New York Times (Science Times), November 12, 2002, p.D6.
  61. Markel, H.: Tailoring Treatments for Teenage Drug Users. The New York Times (Science Times), January 7, 2003, p.D6.
  62. Markel, H.: The Iraq War and Global Public Health. The Globalist, April 21, 2003. Available from: http://www.theglobalist.com.
  63. Markel, H. and Doyle S.: The Epidemic Scorecard. The New York Times (Op-Ed Essay), April 30, 2003, p.A31.
  64. Markel, H.: Use SARS to Raise Public Health Awareness. The Detroit News (Commentary), May 1, 2003, p.12A.
  65. Markel, H.: How to Be the Perfect Parent (And Drown Yourself in Guilt). The New York Times (Science Times), June 17, 2003, p.F5.
  66. Markel, H.: AIDS:  Five Hard Questions for South Africa’s President. The Globalist, July 14, 2003. Available from:  http://www.theglobalist.com.
  67. Markel, H.: The New Yorker Who Changed the Diet of the South. The New York Times (Science Times), August 12, 2003, p.D5.
  68. Markel, H.: Lack of Sleep Takes Its Toll on Student Psyches. The New York Times (Science Times), September 2, 2003, p.D6.
  69. Markel, H.: Germ Warfare. The New York Times (Op-Ed Essay), September 6, 2003, p.A23.
  70. Markel, H.: The Doctor Who Made His Students Wash Up. The New York Times (Science Times), October 7, 2003, p.D6.
  71. Markel, H.: Treatment for Addiction Meets Barriers in the Doctor’s Office. The New York Times (Science Times), October 21, 2003, p.D5.
  72. Markel, H.: H.I.V. Secrecy Is Proving Deadly. The New York Times (Science Times), November 25, 2003, p.D6.
  73. Markel, H.: The Ghost of Medical Atrocities: What’s Next, After the Unveiling?  The New York Times (Science Times), December 23, 2003, p.D6.
  74. Markel, H.: Multiple Missions Put Teaching Hospitals at Risk. The New York Times (Science Times), February 3, 2004, p.D7.
  75. Markel, H.: Lethal Contact (Review of The Great Influenza by John M. Barry). The Washington Post Book World, February 8, 2004, p.5.
  76. Markel, H.: When Big Brother Invades the Examining Room. The New York Times (Science Times), March 16, 2004, p.D6.
  77. Markel, H.: TB:  The Epidemic to Truly Worry About. The Globalist, March 25, 2004. Available from:  http://www.theglobalist.com.
  78. Markel, H.: Life in a Bottle (Review of Pandora’s Baby by Robin Marantz Henig). The New York Times Book Review, March 28, 2004, p.13.
  79. Markel, H.: Putting SARS in Historical Perspective. History News Network, April 26, 2004. Available from:  http://hnn.us/articles/4612.html.
  80. Markel, H.: Shaping the Mold, From Lab Glitch to Lifesaver (Review of The Mold in Dr. Florey’s Coat by Eric Lax). The New York Times (Science Times), April 20, 2004, p.D6. (Also published as “The Mold in Dr. Florey’s Coat,” International Herald Tribune, April 28, 2004, p.10).
  81. Markel, H.: The Heart of the Matter. The Atlantic Monthly, June 2004, pp.40-41.
  82. Markel, H.: Germs and the Global Market. The Globalist, July 12, 2004 Available from: http://www.theglobalist.com/dbweb/StoryId.aspx?StoryId=4027.
  83. Markel, H.: What’s the Real Issue with AIDS Funding? (Commentary.) Marketplace, Public Radio International, July 15, 2004. Available from:  http://marketplace.publicradio.org/shows/ 2004/07/15_mpp.html.
  84. Stephan Richter, Markel, H.: Vaccines:  The Ultimate Form of U.S. Outsourcing. The Globalist, October 14, 2004. Available from:  http://www.theglobalist.com/story-id4214.
  85. Markel, H.: When Germs Travel. LSA Magazine. Fall, 2004, pp.16-21.
  86. Markel, H.: Second Opinion: What Frist Got Wrong In His Statement on Schiavo.  The New Republic, March 23, 2005. Available from:  http://tnr.com/doc.mhtml?i=w050321&s= markel032305.
  87. Markel, H.: The I.D. of the M.D. from Guadalajara. The New York Times (Week in Review/Ideas and Trends), April 2, 2005, Section 4, p.3.
  88. Markel, H.: When Polio, Every Parent’s Nightmare, Fell to Dr. Salk. The New York Times (Science Times), April 12, 2005, p.D6.
  89. Markel, H.: The Flu Snafu:  The Story Behind Strain A (H2N2). The Globalist (Feature Story), April 18, 2005. Available from:  http://www.theglobalist.com/DBWeb/StoryId.aspx?StoryId =4502.
  90. Markel, H.: A Military Hospital May Itself Become a Casualty.  The New York Times (Science Times), June 28, 2005, p.D5.
  91. Markel, H.: Burning Money. The New York Times (Op-Ed), August 22, 2005, p.A17.
  92. Markel, H.: Quarantine:  The President’s Proposal in Historical Perspective. The Wall Street Journal (Opinion), October 7, 2005, p.A16.
  93. Markel, H.: The Cost of Preventing Bird Flu (Commentary). Marketplace.  National Public Radio, November 1, 2005. Available from:  http://www.marketplace.org/topics/cost-preventing-bird-flu.
  94. Markel, H.: When Teenagers Abuse Prescription Drugs, the Fault May Be the Doctor’s. The New York Times (Science Times), December 27, 2005, p.F8.
  95. Markel, H.: If the Avian Flu Hasn’t Hit, Here’s Why. Maybe. The New York Times (The Week in Review), January 1, 2006, Section 4, p.10.
  96. Markel, H.: Can That Strange Rash Really Be Scarlet Fever?  The New York Times (Science Times), July 25, 2006, p.D5.
  97. Markel, H.: How Two Rights Can Make a Wrong, The New York Times (Nation) February 25, 2007, p.5.
  98. Markel, H.: Tracing the Cigarette’s Path from Sexy to Deadly, The New York Times (Health & Fitness) March 20, 2007, p.D5 (reprinted in The International Herald Tribune, March 21, 2007).
  99. Markel, H.: The Other Side of the Stethoscope.  (Review of “How Doctors Think” by Jerome Groopman)  The Boston Globe, April 8, 2007, p.E7.
  100. Markel, H.: Return of the White Plague.  (Outlook/Sunday) The Washington Post, June 10, 2007, p.B1.
  101. Markel, H.: Outlook:  Old Plagues Don’t Die, They Evolve.  The Washington Post, June 11, 2007. Available from:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2007/06/08 DI2007060802060.html.
  102. Markel, H.: Long Ago against Diphtheria, the Heroes were Horses. The New York Times (Science Times). July 10, 2007, p.D6.
  103. Markel, H.: When Hospitals Kept Children From Parents. The New York Times. (Science Times). January 1, 2008, p.F6.
  104. Markel, H.: An Alcoholic’s Savior: God, Belladonna or Both? The New York Times. (Science
    Times).  April 20, 2009, pp. D5-D6.
  105. Markel, H.: Swine Flu:  Better to Over-Prepare than Under-Prepare. The New Republic. April 28, 2009.  Available from:  http://blogs.tnr.com/tnr/blogs/the_treatment/archive/2009/04/28/swine-flu-better-to-over-prepare-than-under-prepare.aspx.

 

  1. Stern A.M., Markel, H.: Quarantine and the Public Good. (Op-Ed.) Ottawa (Canada) Citizen. April 29, 2009.

 

  1. Markel, H., Stern, A.M.: Blaming the Flu on Mexicans is Immoral. And Foolish.  The New Republic. April 30, 2009.  Available from:  http://blogs.tnr.com/tnr/blogs/the_treatment/archive/ 2009/04/30/scapegoating-mexicans.aspx.

 

  1. Markel, H., Potts, S.: American Epidemics: A Brief History. The New York Times. (Op-Ed/Sunday). May 3, 2009, p. 12.
  2. Markel, H., Stern, A.M.: Don’t Scapegoat Mexico:  Blaming Mexicans for Swine Flu Harms Public Health Efforts. (Op/Ed) The Detroit News. May 4, 2009.
  3. Markel, H.: Forcing Sobriety, However Imperfectly. The New York Times (Science Times).  May 6, 2008, p. D5.
  4. Markel, H.: A Book Doctors Can’t Close.  The New York Times. (Science
    Times). August 18, 2009, p. D5.
  5. Markel, H.: Case Shined First Light on Abuse of Children. The New York Times. (Science
    Times). December 15, 2009, pp. D5-D6.
  6. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Scientist’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. May 21, 2010. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/ 201005215.
  7. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘X-Ray’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. June 18, 2010. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201006187.
  8. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Genome’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. July 9, 2010. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/ archives/201007097.
  9. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Evolution’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. August 13, 2010. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201008136.
  10. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Cell’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. September 17, 2010. Avaialable from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201009178.
  11. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Cancer’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. October 22, 2010. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201010228.
  12. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Atom’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. November 19, 2010. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201011197.
  13. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Comet’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. December 17, 2010. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201012176.
  14. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Physician’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. January 28, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201101284.
  15. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Antibiotic’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. February 11, 2011. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201102116.
  16. Markel, H.: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Vaccines. The New York Times. (Science
    Times). March 1, 2011, p. D5.
  17. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Clone’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. March 11, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201103117.
  18. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Robot’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. April 22, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201104226.

 

  1. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Syphilis’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. May 27, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201105273.
  2. Markel, H.: A Perfect Doctor, but Behind the Times. The New York Times.  (Science Times).  June 13, 2011, p. D6.
  3. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Radio’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. June 24, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201106247.
  4. Markel, H. Markel, H. Excerpt.  An Anatomy of Addiction by Howard Markel.  The New York Times, July 20, 2011. Available from: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/20/books/excerpt-an-anatomy-of-addiction-by-howard-markel.html.
  5. Markel, H.: Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Addiction’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. July 22, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/ archives/201107226.
  6. Markel, H.: Sigmund Freud’s Cocaine Problem.  July 22, 2011. Available from: http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2011/07/22/sigmund-freuds-cocaine-problem/.
  7. Markel, H.: From Freud to Winehouse: The “Anatomy of Addiction”.  CNBC (Guest Author Blog). August 10, 2011. Available from:  http://www.cnbc.com/id/44064175.
  8. Markel, H. Cocaine: A Brief History of Blow. (Photo Essay).  CBS News. August 22, 2011. Available from:  http://www.cbsnews.com/2300-204_162-10008981.html.
  9. Markel, H. Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Chemistry’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. August 26, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201108267.
  10. Markel, H. Was Freud a Freudian?  Not In Your Dreams.  The Washington Post (Sunday Outlook).  September 4, 2011. Available from:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/                                                        opinions/outlook/whats-in-a-name/freud.html.
  11. Markel, H. Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Epilepsy’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. September 30, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201109306.
  12. Markel, H. Science Diction: The Origins of the Word ‘Bunsen Burner’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. October 21, 2011. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201110216.
  13. Markel, H. Does Eating Turkey Actually Make Us Sleepy? The Rundown. PBS NewsHour. November 23, 2011. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/11/why-turkey-makes-us-sleepy.html.
  14. Markel, H.  Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Stethoscope’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. November 25, 2011. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201111255.
  15. Markel, H. It’s the Science, Stupid. (Review of The Origins of AIDS by Jacques Pepin)  The Book: An Online Review at The New Republic, December 15, 2011. Available from: http://www.tnr.com/book/review/jacques-pepin-origin-aids.
  16. Markel, H.  Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Petri Dish’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. December 16, 2011. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201112162.
  17. Markel, H.  Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Moon’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. January 20, 2012. Available from: http://www.sciencefriday.com/ program/archives/201201208.
  18. Markel, H. Don’t Censor Influenza Research. (Op-Ed). The New York Times. February 2, 2012, p. A27.
  19. Markel, H. When the Bad News Comes. (Review of “Malignant:  Medical Ethicists Confront Cancer”, edited by R. Dressler) The New Republic. February 16, 2012. Available from:  http://www.tnr.com/book/review/malignant-cancer-medical-ethics-rebecca-dresser.
  20. Markel, H. The Health of the Oscars. The Rundown. PBS NewsHour. February 23, 2012. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/02/medical-chart-the-health-of-the-oscars.html.
  21. Markel, H. Science Diction: The Origin of the Word Tuberculosis. National Public Radio’s Science Friday/Talk of the Nation. February 24, 2012. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/program/archives/201202248.
  22. Markel, H. The Very Deadliest Habit. (Review of Golden Holocaust: Origins of the Cigarette Catastrophe and the Case for Abolition by Robert N. Proctor) The Book: An Online Review at The New Republic, March 29, 2012. Available from:  http://www.tnr.com/book/review/robert-proctor-golden-holocaust-origins-cigarette-catastrophe-case-abolition.
  23. Markel, H. Deadly Locations.  (Review of Disease Maps: Epidemics on the Ground by Tom Koch) The New Republic. May 24, 2012. Available from:  http://www.tnr.com/book/review/

tom-koch-disease-maps.

 

  1. Markel, H. The D.S.M. Gets Addiction Right. (Op-Ed). The New York Times. June 5, 2012. Available from:  http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/06/opinion/the-dsm-gets-addiction-right.html.

 

  1. Markel, H. “I Have Seen My Death”:  How the World Discovered the X-Ray. PBS NewsHour. December 20, 2012. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2012/12/i-have-seen-my-death-how-the-world-discovered-the-x-ray-html.
  2. Markel, H. How the Boy Became the First to Beat Back Diabetes. PBS NewsHour. January 11, 2013.  Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/01/how-a-dying-boy-became-the-first-to-beat-diabetes.html.
  3. Markel, H. The Day Scientists Discovered the ‘Secret of Life’. PBS NewsHour. February 28, 2013. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/02/the-pub-where-the-secret-of-life-was-first-announced.html.
  4. Markel, H. How a Doctor Discovered U.S. Walls Were Poisonous. PBS NewsHour. March 29, 2013. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/03/how-a-doctor-discovered-us-walls-were-poisonous.html.
  5. Markel, H. The Day Polio Began Losing Its Grip on America. PBS NewsHour. April 12, 2013. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/04/the-day-polio-began-losing-its-grip-on-america.html.
  6. Markel, H. The Day Doctors Began to Conquer Smallpox. PBS NewsHour. May 14, 2013. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/05/the-day-doctors-began-to-conquer-smallpox.html.
  7. Markel, H. A Hormonal Happy Birthday. PBS NewsHour. June 20, 2013. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/06/a-hormonal-happy-birthday.html.
  8. Markel, H. How ‘Going Under the Knife’ Became Much Les Deadly. PBS NewsHour. July 26, 2013. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/07/how-going-under-the-knife-became-much-less-deadly.html.
  9. Markel, H. A Curious Inspiration for the First Stethoscope. PBS NewsHour. August 19, 2013.  Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/08/a-curious-inspiration-for-the-first-stethscope.html.
  10. Markel, H. The Real Story Behind Penicillin. PBS NewsHour. September 27, 2013. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/09/the-real-story-behind-the-worlds-first-antibiotic.html.
  11. Markel, H. One Man’s Rise From ‘Dr. Unqualified’ to Surgeon-in-Chief. PBS NewsHour. November 15, 2013. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/11/one-mans-rise-from-dr-unqualified-to-a-household-name.html.
  12. Markel, H. How to Save a Dying Heart. PBS NewsHour. December 3, 2013. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/12/how-to-save-a-dying-heart.html.
  13. Markel, H. How Elizabeth Blackwell Became the First Female Doctor in the U.S. January 23, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2014/01/elizabeth-blackwell-becomes-the-first-woman-doctor-in-the-united-states.html.
  14. Markel, H. Happy Birthday to Renato Dulbecco, Cancer Researcher Extraordinaire. PBS NewsHour. February 22, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/happy-birthday-renato-dulbecco-cancer-researcher-extraordinaire/
  15. Markel, H. Remembering Sherwin Nuland, a Surgeon Who Healed With Words. The New Republic. March 10, 2014. Available from: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/116958/sherwin-nuland-dead-remembering-surgeon-who-healed-words.
  16. Markel, H. Typhoid Mary’s Life Sentence in Quarantine. PBS NewsHour. March 27, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/typhoid-marys-life-sentence-quarantine/.
  17. Markel, H. ‘The Big Book’ That Gave Alcoholics Hope in 12 Steps Turns 75. PBS NewsHour. April 10, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/alcoholics-anonymous/.
  18. Markel, H. A Deadly Virus Just Arrived in the U.S.. The New Republic. May 4, 2014. Available from:  http://www.newrepublic.com//article/117640/mers-outbreak-it-coming-us-should-you-worry
  19. Markel, H. Clara Barton’s Crusade to Bring the Red Cross to America. PBS NewsHour. May 22, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/clara-barton-founding-american-red-cross/
  20. Markel, H. How Dr. Heimlich Got His Maneuver 40 Years Ago. PBS NewsHour. June 16, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/dr-heimlich-got-maneuver/
  21. Markel, H. Happy 49th Birthday Medicare. PBS NewsHour. July 30, 2014. Available from:  http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/president-johnson-signs-medicare-law/
  22. Markel, H. How Scary Is This Ebola Outbreak?. The New Republic. August 10, 2014. Available from: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119041/ebola-outbreak-africa-expert-epidemics-answers-your-questions
  23. Markel, H. How the ‘Home Run King’ Helped Pioneer Modern Cancer Treatment. PBS NewsHour. August 15, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/august-16-1948-babe-ruth-americas-greatest-baseball-star-pioneer-modern-treatment-cancer-dies/ 
  24. Markel, H. How the Tylenol Murders of 1982 Changed the Way We Consume Medication. PBS NewsHour. September 29, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/tylenol-murders-1982/
  25. Markel, H. Treating Ebola. The Huffington Post. October 13, 2014. Available from: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/howard-markel/treating-ebola_b_5976840.html?1413210905
  26. Markel, H. Before Ebola, Ellis Island’s Terrifying Medical Inspections. PBS NewsHour. October 15, 2014. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/october-15-1965-remembering-ellis-island/
  27. Markel, H. What a Past Epidemic Teaches Us About Ebola. The New Republic. October 19, 2014. Available from: http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119899/ebola-scare-2014-and-cholera-scare-1892-lessons-past
  28. Markel, H. How the Ebola Quarantine Became a ‘States Rights’ Issue. Reuters Opinion. October 30, 2014. Available from: http://blogs. reuters.com/great-debate/2014/10/29/why-quarantining-ebola-patients-is-a-states-rights-issue/
  29. Markel, H. 69 Years Ago, a President Pitches His Idea for National Health Care. PBS NewsHour. November 19, 2014. Available from: http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/november-19-1945-harry-truman-calls-national-health-insurance-program/
  30. Markel, H. 14, 1799: The Excruciating Final Hours of President George Washington. PBS NewsHour. December 14, 2014. Available from: http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/dec-14-1799-excruciating-final-hours-president-george-washington/
  31. Markel, H. How Playing with Dangerous X-rays Led to the Discovery of Radiation Treatment for Cancer. PBS NewsHour. January 28, 2015. Available from: http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/emil-grubbe-first-use-radiation-treat-breast-cancer/
  32. Markel, H. What a 1925 Novel by Sinclair Lewis Can Teach Us About Health Care Today. PBS NewsHour. February 7, 2015. Available from: http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/happy-birthday-sinclair-lewis/
  33. Markel, H. More than Measles: The Threat to America’s “Herd Immunity”. Reuters Opinion. February 24, 2015. Available from: http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/02/24/more-than-measels-the-threat-to-americas-herd-immunity-that-comes-from-within/
  34. Markel, H. The Day We Discovered the Cause of the ‘White Death’. PBS NewsHour. March 24, 2015. Available from:  http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/march-24-1882-robert-koch-announces-his-discovery-of-the-cause-of-tuberculosis/
  35. Markel, H. April 14-15, 1865: The Tragic Final Hours of Abraham Lincoln. PBS NewsHour. April 14, 2015. Available from:  http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/april-15-1865-tragic-last-hours-abraham-lincoln/
  36. Markel, H. In 1850, Ignaz Semmelweis Saved Lives With Three Words: Wash Your Hands. PBS NewsHour. May 15, 2015. Available from: http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/Ignaz-semmelweis-doctor-prescribed-hand-washing/ 
  37. Markel, H. Science Diction: The Origin of the Word ‘Sun’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday. June 1, 2015. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/blogs/06/01/2015/science-diction-sun.html?series=37.
  38. Markel, H. In Honor of Cole Porter’s 124th Brithday, His Story of Triumph Over Pain. PBS NewsHour. June 9, 2015. Available from: http://pbs.org/newshour/updates/june-9-1891-birthday-honor-cole-porters-triumph-pain/.
  39. Markel, H. Science Diction:  The Origin of the Word ‘Dinosaur’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday. July 6, 2015. Available from:  http://sciencefriday.com/blogs/07/06/2015/science-diction-dinosaur.html?series=37.
  40. Markel, H. Happy Birthday to the Woman Who Revolutionized Endocrinology. PBS NewsHour. July 19, 2015. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/happy-birthday-dr-rosalyn-s-yalow-woman-revolutionized-endocrinology.
  41. Markel, H. The ‘Strange’ Death of Warren G. Harding. PBS NewsHour. August 2, 2015. Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/strange-death-warren-harding/.
  42. Markel, H. Science Diction:  The Origin of the Word ‘Thermometer’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday. August 10, 2015. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/blogs/08/10/2015/science-diction-thermometer.html?series=37.
  43. Markel, H. Celebrating the Life of Alice Hamilton, Founding Mother of Occupational Medicine. PBS NewsHour. September 22, 2015. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/ celebrating-life-alice-hamilton-founding-mother-occupational-medicine/.
  44. Markel, H. When a Secret President Ran the Country. PBS NewsHour. October 2, 2015. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/woodrow-wilson-stroke/.
  45. Markel, H. Science Diction:  The Origin of the Word ‘Vaccine’. National Public Radio’s Science Friday. November 2, 2015. Available from:  http://www.sciencefriday.com/articles/the-origin-of-the-word-vaccine/.
  46. Markel, H. No, Oscar Wilde Probably Didn’t Die of Syphilis. PBS NewsHour. November 30, 2015. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/no-oscar-wilde-probably-didnt-die-of-syphilis/.
  47. Markel, H. The Story Behind Alfred Nobel’a Spirit of Discovery. PBS NewsHour. December 10, 2015. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/the-story-behind-alfred-nobela-spirit-of-discovery/.
  48. Markel, H. Albert Schweitzer, a renowned medical missionary with a complicated history. PBS NewsHour. January 14, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/dr-albert-schweitzer-a-renowned-medical-missionary-with-a-complicated-history/.
  49. Markel, H. Was Charles Dickens the first celebrity medical spokesman?. PBS NewsHour. February 6, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/was-charles-dickens-the-first-celebrity-medical-spokesman/.
  50. Markel, H. Want to Understand Epidemics? Here are the 7 Things to Read and Watch. The Washington Post. March 4, 2016. Available from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions /2016/ 03/04/40035024-e17a-11e5-9c36-e1902f6b6571_story.html.
  51. Markel, H. Celebrating Rebecca Lee Crumpler, first African-American woman physician. PBS NewsHour. March 9, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/celebrating-rebecca-lee-crumpler-first-african-american-physician/.
  52. Markel, H. Remembering Ryan White, the teen who fought against the stigma of AIDS. PBS NewsHour. April 8, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/remembering-ryan-white-the-teen-who-fought-against-the-stigma-of-aids/.
  53. Markel, H. How Dr. Arthur Conan Doyle cracked the case of the Tuberculosis ‘remedy’. PBS NewsHour. May 21, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/how-dr-arthur-conan-doyle-cracked-the-case-of-the-tuberculosis-remedy/.
  54. Markel, H. Did Lou Gehrig actually die of ‘Lou Gehrig’s Disease’? PBS NewsHour. June 17, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/did-lou-gehrig-actually-die-of-lou-gehrigs-disease/.
  55. Markel, H. Louis Pasteur’s risky move to save a boy from almost certain death. PBS NewsHour. July 7, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/louis-pasteurs-risky-move-to-save-a-boy-from-almost-certain-death/.
  56. Markel, H. Marilyn Monroe and the prescription drugs that killed her. PBS NewsHour. August 5, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/marilyn-monroe-and-the-prescription-drugs-that-killed-her.
  57. Markel, H. The dirty, painful death of President James A. Garfield. PBS NewsHour. September 16, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/the-dirty-painful-death-of-president-james-garfield/.
  58. Markel, H. Column: The failed broadway musical I wish every medical student could see. PBS NewsHour. October 10, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/postmortem- failed-broadway-musical/.
  59. Markel, H. Unlocking the medical mysteries of King Tut’s tomb. PBS NewsHour. November 4, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/discovery-king-tuts-tomb/.
  60. Markel, H. A symphony of second opinions on Mozaart’s final illness. PBS NewsHour. December 5, 2016. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/symphony-secon-opinions-mozarts-final-illness/.
  61. Markel, H. The infectious disease that sprung Al Capone from Alcatraz. PBS NewsHour. January 25, 2017. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/infectious-disease-sprung-al-capone-alcatraz/.
  62. Markel, H. How poet John Keats met his early end. PBS NewsHour. February 23, 2017. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/column-poet-john-keats-met-early-end/.
  63. Markel, H. Diagnosing Vincent Van Gogh. PBS NewsHour. March 30, 2017. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/diagnosing-vincent-van-gogh/.
  64. Markel, H. Scott Fitzgerald’s life was a study in destructive alcoholism. PBS NewsHour. April 11, 2017.  Available from:  http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/f-scott-fitzgeralds-life-study-destructive-alcoholism.
  65. Markel, H. How Florence Nightingale cleaned up ‘Hell on earth’ hospitals and became an international hero. PBS NewsHour. May 12, 2017. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/florence-nightingale-cleaned-hell-earth-hospitals-became-international -hero.
  66. Markel, H. Alzheimer and the patient who helped reveal a devastating disease. PBS NewsHour. June 15, 2017. Available from: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/updates/dr-alzheimer-patient-helped-reveal–devastating-disease/.

 

GRANTS AND CONTRACTS

National Institutes of Health, National Center for Human Genome Research, National Research Service Award, Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of the Human Genome Initiative Program, “The Stigma of Disease: Implications of Genetic Screening,” 1991-1994 ($120,000).

Principal Investigator, National Institutes of Health, James A. Shannon Director’s Award, “U.S. Immigration Policy and the Public Health, 1880-1995,” 1996-1998 ($100,000).

Principal Investigator, Dorothy and Lewis Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers, The New York Public Library, “American Immigration and the Public Health in the 20th          Century,” 1999-2000 ($53,000).

Principal Investigator, Burroughs-Wellcome Fund, A National Symposium on the History of Children’s Health Care in the United States, 2000 ($5,000).

Principal Investigator, Burroughs-Wellcome Fund, History of Medicine and Science 40th Anniversary Award, “American Health-Care Providers and Foreign Born Patients: A Historical Study of Health-Care Policies and Delivery for Russian-Jewish, Mexican and Chinese Immigrants, 1965-Present,” 1997-2001 ($60,000).

Principal Investigator, Michigan State Medical Society Foundation, “Freedom House Oral History Project,” 1999-2001 ($5,000).

Principal Investigator, The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Scholar Award, “American Doctors and Foreign Patients: Health Care Delivery for Russian, Jewish, Mexican, and Chinese Immigrants to the United States, 1880-1995,” 1996-2002 ($240,000).

Principal Investigator, The Commonwealth Fund, “American Pediatrics: An Historical Perspective,” 2003-2004 ($50,000).

Principal Investigator, “A Historical Assessment of Nonpharmaceutical Disease Containment Strategies Employed by Selected U.S. Communities during the Second Wave of the 1918-1920 Influenza Epidemic.” U.S. Department of Defense/Defense Threat Reduction Agency Advanced Systems and Concepts Office.  Contract DTRA02-03-D-0017/Delivery Order 18.  July 20, 2005 – February 1, 2006 ($458,197).

Co-Principal Investigator, National Library of Medicine/National Institutes of Health History of Medicine Award, “From Coercion to Choice: The History and Future of Genetic Counseling in the United States,” 2005-2007 ($126,096).

Principal Investigator, “A Historical Assessment of Nonpharmaceutical Disease Mitigation Strategies Taken by 50 American Cities during the 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic.” U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services/U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Aug 1, 2006-July 30, 2007. Contract# 200-2006-1684, ($780,506).

Principal Investigator, “Historical Study of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions in the Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1920.” U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services/U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sept. 24, 2007-July 30, 2008. Contract# 200-2007-23211, ($779,167).

Principal Investigator, “History Informing Public Health Preparedness Policy in the 21st Century:  A Qualitative Study of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions and Community Experiences During the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.”  Robert Wood Johnson Investigator Award in Health Care Policy Research, July 1, 2008-June 30, 2013. ($335,000).

Principal Investigator, “Historical Study of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions in the Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1920.”  U.S Dept. of Health and Human Services/U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Aug 24, 2008-Sept 23, 2009.  Contract #000HCVKC-2008-59869, ($950,386).

Principal Investigator, “Historical Study of Nonpharmaceutical Interventions in the Influenza Pandemic of 1918-1920.” U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services/U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sept. 24, 2009-Sept. 23, 2010. Contract # 00HCVKC1-2009-72954, ($905,939).

Co-Principal Investigator, “The American Influenza Epidemic of 1918-1919: A Digital Encyclopedia”.  “We the People” Award.  National Endowment for the Humanities, September 1, 2010-June 30, 2012, ($314,688).

Principal Investigator, “Contemporary Historical Study of Non-pharmaceutical Infection Control Measures (NPI) Employed During the 2009 H1N1 Pandemic.” U.S. Dept of Health and Human Services/U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sept. 22, 2010-Sept. 21, 2014. Contract# 200-2010-35768, ($4,080,816).

 

 

ENDOWMENT FUNDS :

(N.B., these gifts were developed by Dr. Markel at the University of Michigan; these figures do not reflect current market value of these endowments, which, thanks to the University’s investment strategy, is significantly higher).

 

1999                George E. Wantz Distinguished Professorship in the History of Medicine               ($3.500,000).

1998                Horace W. Davenport History of Medicine Fund ($116,000).

1999                David Murray Cowie History of Medicine Fund ($45,000).

2000                Dean’s Endowment for the U-M Center for the History of Medicine ($6,000,000).

2002                Alfred O. Lee History of Medicine Fund ($196,000).

2004                Clifford L. Kiehn, M.D. History of Medicine Fund ($54,700).

2006                Zina Pitcher Collegiate Professorship in the History of Medicine ($1,000,000).

 

 

CERTIFICATION  &  LICENSURE

1987                Diplomate, National Board of Medical Examiners

1989-2013       Diplomate, American Board of Pediatrics

1989-1993       Maryland State Medical License (#D37941)

1991-               U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency Certification (#BM2873075)

1991-1993       Maryland Controlled Substance (#M33007)

1993-               Michigan Medical License (#G835833)

1993-               Michigan Controlled Substance License (#G835884)

 

 

HONORS  & AWARDS 

1978                Regents-Alumni Scholarship, University of Michigan

1979                William Branstrom Freshman Prize, University of Michigan

1979-1982       James B. Angell Scholar, University of Michigan

1981                College of Literature, Sciences, and Arts Merit Scholarship, University of Michigan

1981                Phi Beta Kappa, University of Michigan

1985                SmithKline Beckman Medical Perspectives Scholar

1991                Charles E. Culpeper Foundation Lectureship in the History of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University

1991-1993       Harriet Lane Research Fellow, The Johns Hopkins Hospital

1996                Child Magazine’s Book of the Year (The Practical Pediatrician)

1996-2000       Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Scholar

1996                James A. Shannon Director’s Award, National Institutes of Health

1997                Burroughs-Wellcome Foundation 40th Anniversary History of Medicine Award

1997                Elected Member, Society for Pediatric Research

1998                George Rosen Memorial Lectureship, Beaumont Medical History Club, Yale University

1999                Centennial Historian of the City of New York (Presented by the Mayor of New York City and the New York City Commissioner of Cultural Affairs)

1999-2000       Inaugural Fellow, Center for Scholars and Writers, The New York Public Library

2000                Charles E. Culpeper Foundation Lectureship in the History of Medicine, The University of Minnesota

2000                Melinda Rosenblatt Lectureship, National Yiddish Book Center, Amherst, Massachusetts

2000-               Biographical Profile listed in Who’s Who in America

2001                Elected Member, American Pediatric Society

2001                Robert P. Hudson Lectureship in the History of Medicine, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas

2002-               Biographical Profile listed in Who’s Who in Medicine and Healthcare

2003                Arthur Viseltear Prize for Outstanding Contributions in the History of Public Health, American Public Health Association

2004-               Biographical Profile Listed in Who’s Who in the Midwest

2004                The Globalist Magazine’s Top Ten Books of 2004 (When Germs Travel)

2005                John K. Lattimer Lectureship, The New York Academy of Medicine

2005                University of Michigan College of Literature, Science and the Arts Honors College Book of the Year (When Germs Travel)

2005-               Elected Member, The Scientific Club of the University of Michigan

2005-               Biographical Profile listed in Who’s Who in Health Sciences Education

2005-               Biographical Profile listed in Who’s Who in the Humanities

2006-               Biographical Profile listed in Who’s Who in the World

2006                Raymond Waggoner Lectureship in Ethics and Human Values, Department of Psychiatry, the University of Michigan Medical Center

2006-2013       Elected Member, American Clinical and Climatological Association

2006-2007       The John Rich Professorship at the University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities

2007-               Biographical Profile listed in Who’s Who in Science and Engineering

2007                Fedele F. and Iris M. Fauri Memorial Lectureship, University of Michigan School of Social Work

2007                Theodore E. Woodward Award, American Clinical and Climatological Association

2007                Robert Wood Johnson Investigator’s Award in Health Policy

2008-               Elected Member, Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences

2008                Samuel X. Radbill Lectureship in the History of Medicine, College of Physicians of Philadelphia

2009-2012       Senior Fellow, Michigan Society of Fellows, University of Michigan

2010                J. Buren Sidbury Lectureship in Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University

2010                Josiah C. Trent Lectureship in Medical Humanities, J.C. Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities and the History of Medicine, Duke University

2010                Commencement Speaker.  Department of English Literature and Language, College of Literature, Science and the Arts, University of Michigan

2010                The Beaumont Lectureship, William Beaumont Society of the History of Medicine, Yale University

2010                Elected Honorary Member, William Beaumont Society of the History of Medicine, Yale University

2011                The Harry Feldman Lectureship of the American Epidemiological Society

2011                New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice (An Anatomy of Addiction)

2011                New York Times Best Seller List (Nonfiction: An Anatomy of Addiction). This book also made the San Francisco Chronicle, Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble.com, and ABA Indie Books Best Seller Lists.

2011                John Gilbride, M.D., Memorial Lecture in the History of Medicine. The Johns Hopkins Institute for the History of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

2011                The John McGovern Lectureship in the History of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

2011                The Helen and Daniel Sonenshine Lectureship in Jewish Studies and Interfaith Understanding, Old Dominion University.

2011                The Alexis Hartmann Visiting Professor and Lectureship at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, Washington University in St. Louis

2012                Elected Member, American Epidemiological Society

2015                Sherwin B. Nuland Lectureship, Yale University

2015-2016       John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship

2016                Induction into Society of Scholars of The Johns Hopkins University

2016                Distinguished Alumnus Service Award, The University of Michigan Medical School and Medical Center Alumni Society

2016                The Biennel Asa Gray Lectureship, The University of Michigan Commons

 

 

MEMBERSHIPS  AND  OFFICES  IN  PROFESSIONAL  SOCIETIES

American Academy of Pediatrics

1986-1993       Associate Resident Fellow

1994-               Fellow

 

American Association for the History of Medicine

1984-               Member

1990-1995       Co-Chair, Clinician-Historian Group

1994-1997       Executive Council

1997                William Osler Medal Committee

1998                Fielding H. Garrison Lectureship Committee

2000                William Osler Medal Committee

2001                Fielding H. Garrison Lectureship Committee

2002                William H. Welch Book Medal Committee

2003                Chair, William H. Welch Book Medal Committee

2006                Fielding H. Garrison Lectureship Committee

2009                Program Chair, 2009 Annual Meeting

 

 

American Jewish Historical Society

2000-2010       Academic Council Member

 

Society for Pediatric Research (elected 1997)

 

American Pediatric Society (elected 2002)

Scientific Club of the University of Michigan (elected 2005)

2011-12           Principal Servant

 

American Clinical and Climatological Association (elected 2006)

2006-2013               Member

 

Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences (elected as Life Member, 2008)

2011-13           Vice Chair, Section (11) on Social Sciences

2013-15           Chair, Section (11) on Social Sciences

2011-15           Membership Committee

2012-15           Board of Population Health

2014                Subcommittee on 2014 Emphasis Area:  Innovators in Health Professional Education

 

University of Michigan Society of Fellows

2009-13           Senior Fellow

 

American Epidemiological Society

2012-               Life Member    (elected, 2012)

 

 

OTHER SCIENTIFIC AND  SCHOLARLY  ACTIVITIES

Editorial Boards

1993-2002    Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine

1993-2003    Classics of Pediatrics Library [appointed chair of editorial board in 2002]

1997-2000    Kidshealth at the AMA Interactive Website

1998-2000    Associate Editor and Editorial Board Member, The Scribner’s Encyclopedia of Human Diseases and Conditions

2000-2008    Editorial Board, Medscape Pediatrics

2002-            Board of Managers, Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences

2002-2010    Senior Editor, “Conversations in Medicine and Society,” a book series on American medicine, society and culture for the University of Michigan Press.

2013-            Editor-in-Chief, The Milbank Quarterly

 

Boards of Directors

2003-2008    Board of Directors, National Yiddish Book Center, Amherst, MA. Chair, Program Committee Member, Nominating Committee

2003-2004    Academic Advisory Board, Celebrate 350: Jewish Life in America, 1654-2004

2004-2012    National Leadership Council, Physicians and Lawyers for National Drug Policy, Providence, Rhode Island

 

Reviewer of Books/Scholarly Articles

1991-            Bulletin of the History of Medicine

1993-            Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

1993-            Journal of the History of Medicine

1994-            American Journal of Public Health

1994-            Journal of the American Medical Association

1994-            Journal of General Internal Medicine

1994-            Medical History (London)

1994-            Pediatrics

1994             Rutgers University Press

1995-            ISIS, the Journal of the History of Science

1995-            Technology and Culture

1996-            Harvard University Press

1996-            International Migration Review

1996-            The Johns Hopkins University Press

1996-            Social History of Medicine (England)

1998-            Jewish Social Studies: History, Culture and Society

1999-            Oxford University Press

1999-            Health Affairs

2001-            Milbank Quarterly

2002-            University of California Press

2003-            Public Health Reports

2003-            Cambridge University Press

2003-            University of Michigan Press

2004-            The Wellcome Trust (England)

2005-            Emerging Infectious Diseases

2009-            University of Pittsburgh Press

2009-            Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science, Forum on Microbial Threats, Board on Global Health

2010-            New England Journal of Medicine

 

 

TEACHING  ACTIVITIES

National

See:  Extramural Invited Presentations

 

University of Michigan Medical School

1993-               Lecturer, Medicine and Society Sequence of the “Introduction to the Patient” Course

1993-1998       Lecturer, Medical Ethics and the Practice of Pediatrics Course developed for the University of Michigan Pediatrics House Staff Program

1993-1999       Instructor, Adolescent Medicine Sequence for Medical Students and Pediatrics House Officers

1993-1999       Attending Physician, General Pediatrics Inpatient Service, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital

1993-1996       Consulting Physician, Adolescent Inpatient Consultation Service, C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital

1993-2002       Attending Physician, Adolescent and General Pediatrics Clinics

1993-1999       Attending Physician, Marshall H. Becker Memorial Clinic

1993-1996       Attending Physician, Adolescent Gynecology Clinic, Departments of Obstetrics/Gynecology and Pediatrics

1994-1996       Faculty Sponsor, University of Michigan-NIH Medical Student Summer Research Fellowship

1994-1995       Faculty Small Group Leader, Ethnicity and the Doctor-Patient Relationship, “Introduction to the Patient” Course

1994-1999       Faculty Mentor, Department of Pediatrics Journal Club

1994-               Faculty Sponsor, The Victor Vaughan Society for the History and Philosophy of Medicine

1994-1999       Faculty Sponsor, Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society

1995-1996       Course Director, Senior Elective Course in Literature and Medicine

1996-2011       Course Director, Applying Humanities to Clinical Medicine, Science and Clinics Senior Elective Course

2002-2011       Faculty Mentor, Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholars Program, University of Michigan

 

University of Michigan College of Literature, Science and the Arts

1998-2010       Faculty Advisor, Undergraduate Honors Thesis Students, Department of History, Program in American Culture

1999-2002       Faculty Advisor and Ph.D. Dissertation Committee Member, Graduate Program, Department of History, (John McKiernan-Gonzalez)

2000-2002       Instructor/Course Director, First Year Seminar, “Epidemics in American History,” Honors Program, Department of History, (Fall Terms, 2000, 2001, 2002)

2000-2001       Ph.D. Dissertation Committee Member, Department of English Language and Literature, (Creighton Don)

2004-2005       Instructor, “Social Dynamics of Science and Technology”, Residential College, (Winter Terms, 2004, 2005)

2010-               “Illness Narratives: Literature, Medicine and Disease”, Department of English Language and Literature, (Fall Term, 2010, 2013, 2014)

2012-               Ph.D. Dissertation Committee Member, Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Medical School, (Sirarat Sarntivijai)

2013-14           Ph.D. Dissertation Committee Member, Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health (Brian Davis)

 

Ph.D. Committees (outside institutions)

2002-2003       Ph.D. Dissertation Committee Member, Department of History, Yale University (Amir A. Afkhami)

 

 

EXTRAMURAL  INVITED  PRESENTATIONS

International

  1. “Layers of Separation: Epidemics and the Quarantining of Immigrants in New York City During the 19th Century,” Colloquium Speaker Series, The Wellcome Institute for the History of Medicine, University of London and the British Museum, London, England, December 8, 1993.
  2. “Trachoma and the Jewish American Immigration Experience, 1897-1924: The View from New York Harbor,” American Association for the History of Medicine, Annual Meeting, Toronto, Canada, May 8, 1998.
  3. “The Eyes Have It: Trachoma and the Medical Inspection of East European Jews at Ellis Island, New York, 1897-1924,” Jews and the Social and Biological Sciences, University of Oxford Centre for Hebrew and Jewish Studies, Oxford, England, August 3, 1998.
  4. “Averting a Pestilence: Typhus Fever on New York’s Lower East Side, 1892,” International    Conference on Jews and Medicine: Religious Thought, Cultural Patterns and Practical Applications, Cohn-Haddow Center for Judaic Studies and Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, May 7, 2001.
  5. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics, Quarantines and the Microbial World,” Fourth International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, March 1, 2004.
  6. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics and Anxiety in Modern America,” Opening Plenary Address, Reframing Infectious Disease: An International Conference Probing the Relevance of the Humanities to Epidemiology, Disease Models and the Global AIDS Pandemic, University of Michigan Institute for the Humanities, Ann Arbor, Michigan, December 2, 2004.
  7. “Ellis Island and Beyond: 100 Years of Immigration to the Eastern Seaboard of the United States.”  Immigrant Health: A Transatlantic Perspective. Annual Symposium of the New York Academy of Medicine and the Royal Society of Medicine (United Kingdom).  Held in New York City, New York, June 14, 2005.
  8. “Contemplating Epidemics: Social, Economic, Political and Cultural Aspects of Contagious Crises across Time.” Presented at:  6th International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/World Health Organization, Atlanta, GA, USA.  March 19th, 2008.
  9. “Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Implemented by US Cities During the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” First Annual Oxford Conference on Avian Influenza and Human Health, St. Hilda’s College, Oxford University, Oxford, Great Britain, September 10, 2008.
  10. “When Germs Travel: Social, Economic, Political and Cultural Aspects of Contagious Crises Across Time.” International Meeting on Emerging Diseases and Surveillance.  International Society for Infectious Diseases, Vienna, Austria. February 16, 2009.
  11. “Informing 21st Century Pandemic Preparedness Policy with Historical Analysis of the 1918-19 American Influenza Experience”. International Conference on the Future of Medical History. Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine, University College London, London, Great Britain, July 15, 2010.
  12. “The 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Pandemic and the ‘Blame Game’: A Brief History”. International Meeting on Emerging Diseases and Surveillance. International Society for Infectious Diseases, Vienna, Austria. February 5, 2011.

 

National

  1. “H.L. Mencken’s Collaboration with Leonard K. Hirshberg (Mencken and the Doctors),” The Johns Hopkins Institute of the History of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, February 23, 1988.
  2. “Chronic Granulomatosis Disease,” Pediatric Trends, a Postgraduate Course in Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, April 14, 1989.
  3. “H.L. Mencken’s Foray into Pediatrics,” Enoch Pratt Free Library Annual Mencken Day Celebration in conjunction with the Mencken Society, Baltimore, MD, September 9, 1989.
  4. “What You Ought to Know About H. L. Mencken’s What You Ought to Know About Your Baby,” Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, November 22, 1989.
  5. “A Medical Historian’s View of Baby Advice Books, 1890-1990,” Friends of the Johns Hopkins Children’s Center Celebration, Baltimore, MD, January 26, 1990.
  6. “Child Care in the United States in the Early 20th Century,” Children and Hospitals Week Program, Washington County Hospital Association, Hagerstown, MD, March 13, 1990.
  7. “19th Century Concepts of Infectious Disease and Epidemics,” Baltimore City Life Museums Program on 19th Century America, Baltimore, MD, April 28, 1990.
  8. “American Pediatrics during the Progressive Era: A Social History Perspective,” Departments of Epidemiology and Social Medicine and Pediatrics, Charles E. Culpeper Lecture in the History of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY, September 12, 1991.
  9. “Medical Historians Who Practice Medicine Workshop,” Co-Moderator, American Association of the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, Seattle, WA, May 1, 1992.
  10. “The Stigma of Disease: Implications of Genetic Screening from the Historical Record,” Convocation for Scholars, Ethical, Legal and Social Implications of Human Genome Research Initiative, sponsored by the U.S. Initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, Washington, D.C., September 14, 1992.
  11. “Eugenics in America, 1895-1925,” Genetics and Public Policy course conducted at School of Public Health and Hygiene, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, September 18, 1992.
  12. “The History of Sickle Cell Disease in America: Race, Health, and Medicine in the United States,” course conducted at School of Arts and Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, March 30, 1993.
  13. “Layers of Separation: Cholera, Class, and Quarantines in New York City, 1892,” American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, Louisville, KY, May 16, 1993.
  14. “A Forum for Historians Who Practice Medicine,” American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, Louisville, KY, May 16, 1993.
  15. “The Concept of Quarantine: Cholera and Immigration in New York of 1892,” Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, September 8, 1993.
  16. “Knocking Out the Cholera: Quarantines and Epidemics During the Rise of the Germ Theory Era in New York City,” Heberden Society Lecture, Dean’s Lecture Series on the History of Medicine, New York Hospital-Cornell University Medical Center, New York, NY, October 27, 1993.
  17. “The Gates to the City: The Baltimore U.S.P.H.S. Quarantine Station, 1918-1928,” United States Public Health Service Commissioned Officers Association Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD, April 6, 1994.
  18. “The Development of Professional Clinician-Historians,” National Meeting of M.D.-Ph.D. Social Scientists, Department of Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, April 8, 1994.
  19. “A Dialogue for Clinician-Historians Workshop,” American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Meeting, New York, NY, April 28, 1994.
  20. “Averting a Pestilence: The Typhus Fever Epidemic of 1892 in New York City’s Lower East Side,” presented at the 67th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine, New York, NY, April 28, 1994.
  21. “History for Health Care Professionals. Perspectives, Research Approaches, and Writing Skills,” Visiting Professor, Postgraduate Course at the University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, July 13-16, 1994.
  22. “Cholera, Quarantines and Immigration During the Gilded Age,” History of Medicine Program Colloquium of Columbia University, State University of New York at Stonybrook, and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, New York, NY, December 14, 1994.
  23. “Averting a Pestilence: Epidemics on New York’s Jewish Lower East Side,” New York Council for the Humanities and National Endowment for the Humanities Lecture Series: Race and Ethnicity in American Medicine: An Historical Perspective, New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY, December 15, 1994.
  24. “David Murray Cowie, M.D. and the Development of Iodized Salt,” Visiting Professor of the History of Pediatrics, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Kansas City, MO, January 26, 1995.
  25. “The Genesis of the Iron Lung for Poliomyelitis: An Historical Perspective,” Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, January 27, 1995.
  26. “Clinical Historical Societies and the History of Medicine,” National Annual Meeting, American Association for the History of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, May 11, 1995.
  27. “The Genesis of the Iron Lung: Philip Drinker, Charles F. McKhann, James L. Wilson and Early Attempts at Administering Artificial Respiration to Patients with Poliomyelitis,” Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, October 25, 1995.
  28. “Averting a Pestilence: The New York City Typhus Fever Epidemic of 1892 and the Quarantine of East European Jewish Immigrants,” Departments of Social Medicine and the History of Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, October 26, 1995.
  29. The Concept of Quarantine,” National Meeting of M.D.-Ph.D. Social Scientists, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, April 12, 1996.
  30. “The BRCA I Gene for Breast Cancer and Ashkenazi Jews: Historical Perspectives of Genetic Screening,” Colloquium on Genetic Screening, Case Western Reserve University Schools of Law and Medicine, Cleveland, OH, April 26, 1996.
  31. “American Doctors and Foreign Patients: Health Care Delivery For Russian Jewish, Mexican, and Chinese Immigrants to the United States, 1880-1995,” Annual Meeting of the Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Scholars, San Antonio, TX, December 6, 1996.
  32. “Epidemics,” Moderator of Session at the Annual Meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine, Williamsburg, VA, April 6, 1997.
  33. “Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892,” New-York Historical Society Lecture Series, New York, NY, May 17, 1997.
  34. “Averting a Pestilence: Typhus Fever on the Lower East Side,” Tenement Museum of New York City, New York, NY, May 18, 1997.
  35. “Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892,” Grand Rounds, Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, September 24, 1997.
  36. “The Stigma of Disease: Historical Perspectives of Genetic Screening,” Genetics and Public Health Lecture Series, National Institutes of Health Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of the Human Genome Project and Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA, November 5, 1997.
  37. “Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892,” The George Rosen Memorial Lecture of the Beaumont History of Medicine Society, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, February 20, 1998.
  38. “Caring for the Foreign-Born: The Health of Immigrant Children in the United States, 1890-1925,” Plenary Session of the Head Start 4th National Research Conference on Immigration and Migration and its Effects on Communities/Children and Families in an Era of Rapid Change, Washington, D.C., July 11, 1998.
  39. “Cholera May Knock, But It Won’t Get In: Cholera, Class and Quarantine in New York Harbor During the Late 19th Century,” Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and School of Public Health, New York, NY, October 9, 1998.
  40. “The Eyes Have It: Trachoma and the American Jewish Immigration Experience, 1880-1924,” College of Physicians, Philadelphia, PA, November 12, 1998.
  41. Moderator, Session on Generalist Physician Scholars Issues, Annual Meeting of the Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Physician Scholars, Tucson, AZ, December 3, 1998.
  42. “Trachoma and the American Jewish Immigrant Experience, 1897-1924: The View from New York Harbor,” American Jewish Historical Society Session, 113th Annual Meeting of the American Historical Association, Washington, D.C., January 8, 1999.
  43. “Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892,” New York Society of Infectious Diseases-American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY, April 12, 1999.
  44. “When Germs Travel: Immigration and Public Health in American History,” Plenary Lecture, Knight Center for Specialized Journalism Seminar on Media and Public Health, University of Maryland at College Park, MD, June 6, 1999.
  45. “The Eyes Have It: The Role of Trachoma in the American Jewish Immigration Experience, 1897-1924,” New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY, September 8, 1999.
  46. “Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892,” Grand Rounds, Department of Internal Medicine, Montefiore Hospital, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, September 30, 1999.
  47. “The Democratization of Medical Knowledge in the Age of Mass Media and the Internet,” Annual Meeting of the Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Physician Scholars, Tucson, AZ, December 9, 1999.
  48. “American Doctors and Foreign Patients: Health Care Delivery for Russian Jewish, Mexican, and Chinese Immigrants to the United States, 1880-Present,” Annual Meeting of the Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Scholars, Tucson, AZ, December 9, 1999.
  49. “Applying the Medical Humanities to Clinical Medicine,” Annual Meeting of the Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Physician Scholars, Tucson, AZ, December 10, 1999.
  50. “Watching for Disease at the Gates of the City: Trachoma, Immigration and Ellis Island, 1897-1924,” University Seminar on the City, Department of History, Columbia University, New York, NY, January 19, 2000.
  51. “Immigration, Isolation and 19th Century Epidemics,” Guest Lecturer at the Social History of American Public Health Graduate Seminar, Columbia University, New York, NY, February 16, 2000.
  52. “When Germs Travel: Immigration and the Public Health During the 20th Century,” Colloquium of the Department of Medical Anthropology, History and Social Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California and the Department of History, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, February 28, 2000.
  53. “From the Archives to the Clinics and Back: An Intellectual Biography of a Clinician-Historian,” Department of Medical Anthropology, History and Social Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, February 29, 2000.
  54. “Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892,” Visiting Professorship, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, March 8, 2000.
  55. “Charles Dickens and His Work to Help Establish London’s Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital,” Visiting Professorship, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, March 8, 2000.
  56. “Why History Matters: Medical History and Medical Practice,” Visiting Professorship, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, March 8, 2000.
  57. “When Germs Travel: Public Health and the American Immigration Experience, 1890-2000,” Charles E. Culpeper Foundation Lecture, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, April 17, 2000.
  58. “American Doctors and Immigrant Patients in the 20th Century,” On Doctoring Lecture Series, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, MN, April 18, 2000.
  59. “Primum Non Nocere: Writing About Our Patients,” The Dean’s Committee on Medical Ethics Colloquium, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, April 26, 2000.
  60. “Quarantine! East European Jewish Immigrants and the New York City Epidemics of 1892,” The Melinda Rosenblatt Memorial Lecture, National Yiddish Book Center, Amherst, MA, May 7, 2000.
  61. “When Germs Travel: A Doctor’s Story of Immigration and Disease in the 20th Century,” Center for Scholars and Writers, The New York Public Library, New York, NY, October 18, 2000.
  62. “Blowing the Whistle: The Internship of William Carlos Williams, M.D. and His Abrupt Resignation from the New York Nursery and Child’s Hospital,” Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, Chicago, IL, December 8, 2000.
  63. “The Eyes Have It: The Role of Trachoma and the American Immigrant Experience,” Department of History and Philosophy of Medicine, University of Kansas Medical School, Kansas City, KS, April 19, 2001.
  64. “Prescribing Arrowsmith: Why Literature is Important to the Practice of Medicine,” 5th Annual Chief Residents Invited Lecture and Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University, School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, May 25, 2001.
  65. “When Germs Travel: Immigration and the Public Health,” Center for Health and Well-Being, The Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Princeton, NJ, October 11, 2001.
  66. “When Germs Travel: American Stories of Imported Infection,” Ground Rounds, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Baltimore, MD, April 4, 2002.
  67. “When Germs Travel: American Stories of Imported Infection,” Ground Rounds, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Baltimore, MD, April 4, 2002.
  68. “Sounding the Alarm of Cholera in Detroit,” Master’s Lecture, Pierson College, Yale University, New Haven, CT, April 5, 2002.
  69. “Sounding the Cholera Alarm in Detroit: An Immigration Story of the Late 20th Century,” Head Start 6th National Research Conference, Washington, D.C., June 28, 2002.
  70. “The History of Baby Care Advice for Parents in the United States, 1900-2002,” Head Start 6th National Research Conference, Washington, D.C., June 28, 2002.
  71. “On the Utility of Medical History: A Panel Discussion (with Ernest B. Hook, Jacalyn Duffin, Jeffrey Baker, Walton O. Schalick), Annual Meeting of the American Association for the History of Medicine, Boston, MA, May 2, 2003.
  72. “What’s Next?: Transition and the Successful Academic Career,” Annual Meeting of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Generalist Faculty Scholars, Houston, TX, December 6, 2003.
  73. “The Concept of Quarantine,” Invited Plenary Lecture, Annual Meeting of the American College of Preventive Medicine, Orlando, FL, February 20, 2004.
  74. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics and Anxiety in Modern America,” Invited Lecture, Annual Meeting of the American College of Preventive Medicine, Orlando, FL, February 20, 2004.
  75. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics and Anxiety in Modern America,” Invited Plenary Lecture, International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sponsored by Centers for Disease Control, World Health Organization, American Society for Microbiology, Atlanta, GA, March 1, 2004.
  76. “Bubonic Plague Strikes San Francisco’s Chinatown in 1900: The Interaction of Germs, Immigrants and the Law,” 3rd Annual Conference on Public Health Law (“The Public’s Health and the Law in the 21st Century”), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Atlanta, GA, June 15, 2004.
  77. “Interdisciplinary Contributions to Public Health Law,” 3rd Annual Conference on Public Health Law (“The Public’s Health and the Law in the 21st Century”), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Atlanta, GA, June 15, 2004.
  78. “Quarantine: Voluntary or Not?” 3rd Annual Conference on Public Health Law (“The Public’s Health and the Law in the 21st Century”), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Atlanta, GA, June 15, 2004.
  79. “Emerging Infectious Diseases: Are We Missing the Story of the New Millennium?” Showcase Presentation, Annual Conference of the Investigative Reporters and Editors Society, Atlanta, GA, June 18, 2004.
  80. “Child Health Care in the 21st Century: Relevance of Lessons Learned from Pediatrics and Public Health in the Late 19th and 20th Centuries,” Master Lecture, Head Start’s 7th National Research Conference: Promoting Positive Development in Young Children. Sponsored by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, and the Head Start Bureau, Washington D.C., June 30, 2004.
  81. “Who’s On First?: Medical Discovery and Scientific Priority. Notes of a Medical Historian,” Child Health Research Centers National Annual Meeting, National Institute of Child Health and Development. Held at Michigan League, Ann Arbor, MI, October 16, 2004.
  82. “The Journey of Germs,” Science on the Brink Lecture Series, 92nd Street Y, New York, NY, November 21, 2004.
  83. “Pursuing a Career in Medicine and Medical History,” Science on the Brink Lecture Series, 92nd Street Y, New York, NY, November 21, 2004.
  84. “When Germs Travel,” National Pandemic Influenza Symposium, University of Michigan School of Public Health. Held at the Michigan League, Ann Arbor, MI, January 24, 2005.
  85. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics and Anxiety in America,” Master Scholars Program, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, March 16, 2005.
  86. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics and Immigrants in the 20th Century.” John K. Lattimer Lecture, New York Academy of Medicine, New York, NY, April 21, 2005.
  87. “Waves and Ripples: The Historical Meanings of Legacy.” Annual Meeting of the Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Scholars, Jacksonville Beach, FL, November 10, 2005.
  88. “Does History Matter? What the 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic Can Tell Us About Pandemic Preparedness in the 21st Century.” Departments of Medical History and History, Yale University, New Haven, CT, April 3, 2006.
  89. “A Historical Assessment of Nonpharmaceutical Disease Containment Strategies Employed by Selected U.S. Communities during the Second Wave of the 1918-1920 Influenza Epidemic.” Consensus Conference, U.S. Department of Defense/Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Advanced Systems and Concepts Office, McLean, VA, April 5-6, 2006.
  90. “What Can History Teach Us About Pandemic Influenza Preparedness?” Conference on Pandemic Influenza Modeling and Layered Containment Strategies. National Vaccine Program Office.  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington D.C., May 17, 2006.
  91. “Pandemic Influenza: Lessons from Historical Experience:  Personal Preparedness Measures for Pandemic Influenza.” Conference sponsored by the Sloan Foundation and the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness, New York, NY, June 5, 2006.
  92. “Historical Lessons from the 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic: Can the Past Inform the Future?” Consultation on Behavioral Epidemiology Conference, Modeling of Infectious Diseases Agent Study, Sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Brookings Institution, Fred Hutchison Cancer Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, June 20-22, 2006.
  93. “History and Public Health: Lessons from 1918-1920.” Plenary Lecture, The Public’s Health and the Law in the 21st Century. 4th Annual Partnership Conference of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Society of Law, Medicine and Ethics, Atlanta, GA, June 13, 2006.
  94. “The History of Vaccines and Immunization: Familiar Patterns, New Challenges.” Plenary Master Lecture, Head Start, 8th National Research Conference, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Washington D.C., June 26, 2006.
  95. “Contemplating Pandemics: The Role of Historical Inquiry in Developing Pandemic Mitigation Strategies for the 21st Century.” Workshop on the Ethical and Legal Considerations in Mitigation Pandemic Diseases, Board on Global Health, Forum on Microbial Threats, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Washington D.C., September, 19, 2006.
  96. “The Effects of the 1918-1920 Influenza Pandemic on Individuals and Family Life.” Pandemic Influenza: Past, Present and Future Conference, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Washington D.C., October 17, 2006.
  97. “What Can We Learn from the 1918 Influenza Pandemic? Applying Historical Inquiry to the Development of Pandemic Mitigation Strategies for the 21st Century.” Committee Meeting on Modeling Community Containment for Pandemic Influenza, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Washington D.C., October 26, 2006.
  98. “Public Health Interventions during the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” Harvard University International Conference on Pandemic Influenza. Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, December 7, 2006.
  99. “Nonpharmaceutical Interventions and the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” CDC Stakeholders Meeting on Pandemic Preparedness. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, December 12, 2006.
  100. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics and Anxiety in the 21st Century.” Plenary Speaker, Third Biennial California Distance Learning Conference – Building Capacity:  Reaching New Heights in Global Preparedness, South Lake Tahoe, CA, April 5, 2007.
  101. “Narrative and the Immigrant Experience.” Keynote Address. Narrative Matters Conference on Migrants and Immigrants. Sponsored by Health Affairs, Project Hope and the Kellogg Foundation, Airlie, VA, September 9, 2007.
  102. “Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Implemented by 43 U.S. Cities during the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” Program for Health, Culture and Society, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, September 27, 2007.
  103. “Dr. Osler’s Relapsing Fever.” Keynote Address. J. Willis Hurst Symposium on Medical History, Atlanta Medical History Society and Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, September 28, 2007.
  104. “Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Employed by Major American Cities during the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” 120th Annual Meeting of the American Clinical and Climatological Association, Tucson, AZ, October 20, 2007.
  105. “When Germs Travel: A Brief History of International Approaches to Identifying and Containing Infectious Threats.” Conference on Pathogen Movement and the Revised International Health Regulations.  Forum on Microbial Threats, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Washington, DC, February 12, 2008.
  106. “Catching the Flu: Applying Lessons from the Influenza Pandemic of 1918-19 to Public Health Strategies in the 21st Century.”  Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics Research Seminar Series, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, February 29th, 2008.
  107. “Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Implemented by 43 U.S. Cities during the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” Presented at NPI and CDC 18-Month Progress Report Meeting, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, March 19, 2008.
  108. “Catching the Flu: Nonpharmaceutical Interventions Implemented by U.S. Cities During the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” Keynote Address, 2008 Conference on Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza, Infectious Disease Society of America, Arlington, VA, May 18, 2008.
  109. “Designing an Historical Atlas of the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic in the United States: An Encyclopedic Survey of the Public Health and Community Experiences of 50 American Cities During the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic and Their Import for Pandemic Preparedness Today.”  Keynote Lecture, American Red Cross Biomedical Services Pandemic Influenza Workshop, Washington, DC, June 24, 2008.
  110. “A Historical Based Thought Experiment: Meeting the Challenges of the 21st Century for Children’s Well-Being and Health.”  Master’s Lecture. Head Starts 9th National Research Conference, Washington, DC, June 24, 2008.
  111. “No Punches Pulled: Reading and Rereading The House of God.” (Moderator of Panel Discussion).  Annual Meeting of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanism, Cleveland, OH, October 23, 2008.
  112. “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Influenza Pandemic: How Medical History Can Shape Public Health Policy.” The Samuel X. Radbill Lecture. College of Physicians of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, November 19, 2008.
  113. “Panic in the Streets: Negotiating Public Health Crises in Real Time.  Lessons Learned from the Historical Record.”  Workshop on Scientific Needs and the Research Agenda for the Health Risks of Climate Change.  The Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research and Medicine.  Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Washington DC, January 15, 2009.
  114. “Designing an Historical Atlas of the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic in the United States.” Clinical Center Grand Rounds, National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, January 21, 2009.
  115. “When Germs Travel: Social, Economic, Political, and Cultural Aspects of Contagious Crises Across Time.”  The 13th Annual Kenneth R. Crispell Memorial History Lecture.  University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, April 1, 2009.
  116. “I Swear by Apollo:  The Hippocratic Oath and 21st Century Medicine.” Inaugural Lecture in Human Values. Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, April 24, 2009.
  117. “Scapegoating and the H1N1 Pandemic.” Forum on Microbial Threats:  Influenza 2009 A (H1N1):  An Emerging Story. Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Medicine, Washington, DC, June 16, 2009.
  118. “When Germs Travel: Contagious Crises Across Time.” Southeastern Center for Emerging Biologic Threats (SECEBT). Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, June 23, 2009.
  119. “Social Mitigation Strategies and Lessons Learned from the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” The President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), H1N1 Subcommittee Meeting, The White House, Washington DC, July 16, 2009.
  120. “Lessons Learned from the 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic.” Symposium on Community Mitigation Strategies Resulting from the Novel Influenza A (H1N1) Outbreak, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, September 30, 2009.
  121. “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic.” Distinguished Speakers Seminar Series, The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, November 17, 2009.
  122. “The 1918-1919 Influenza Pandemic in the United States: Historical Experiences and Lessons.” Webinar: Planning for a Pandemic – Can History Inform Action? Coordinated by the Office of the Surgeon General of the United States, Association of Schools of Public Health and Public Health Reports, Live Call-in Webcast, November 30, 2009.
  123. “When Germs Travel: Contagious Crises Across Time”. Josiah C. Trent Lecture for the Humanities in Medicine.  Josiah C. Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities and the History of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, April 11, 2010.
  124. “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum”. J. Buren Sidbury Lecture in Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Duke University, Durham, NC, April 12, 2010.
  125. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine. The William Beaumont Lecture, Beaumont Historical Society, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, November 5, 2010.
  126. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. Medical Humanities Lectureship. University of Florida at Gainesville Medical School, Gainesville, FL, March 24, 2011.
  127. “When Germs Travel: Contagious Crises Across Time”. The 26th Annual Harry Feldman Lecture of the American Epidemiological Society, Atlanta, GA, March 31, 2011.
  128. “The 2009 A/H1N1 Influenza Pandemic and the ‘Blame Game’: A Brief History”. Division of Global Migration and Quarantine, U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, GA, April 1, 2011.
  129. “Historical Research to Evaluate Possible Responses to Future Pandemics”. Hertog Seminar in Global Strategy: The History and Future of Pandemic Threats and Global Public Health.  Columbia University, New York, NY, June 2, 2011.
  130. What Can History Teach Us about the Next Pandemic? Panel Discussion with Stephen Morse, George Korch, David Rosner, Randall Packard, and Erez Manela. Hertog Seminar in Global Strategy: The History and Future of Pandemic Threats and Global Public Health. Columbia University in the City of New York, New York, NY, June 2, 2011.
  131. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. The John McGovern Lectureship in the History of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, September 15, 2011.
  132. “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Flu Pandemic. Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, September 21, 2011.
  133. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. John Gilbride, M.D., Memorial Lecture in the History of Medicine. The Johns Hopkins Institute for the History of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, September 22, 2011.
  134. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. Grand Rounds, Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, October 28, 2011.
  135. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”.  The Helen and Daniel Sonenshine Lectureship in Jewish Studies and Interfaith Understanding, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA, November 2, 2011.
  136. “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Flu Pandemic. Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters, Norfolk, VA, November 3, 2011.
  137. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. The Alexis Hartmann Lecture, Department of Pediatrics, The St. Louis Children’s Hospital Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, November 18, 2011.
  138. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. The New School for Social Research, New York, NY, February 1, 2012.
  139. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”.

92nd Street Y/TribeCa Authors’ Lecture Series, New York, NY, April 20, 2012.

  1. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”.

(Keynote Address)  Doris Duke Foundation Clinical Scientists Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL, April 27, 2012.

  1. “Contagious Crisis Across Time: Can They Inform Contemporary Public Health Policy?”.

Board on Population Health and Public Health Practices, Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, May 2, 2012.

 

  1. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”.

Grand Rounds. M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX,

May 18, 2012.

 

  1. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”.

The First Lecture. University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, San Diego,

CA, September 4, 2012.

 

  1. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”.

Medical Grand Rounds. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, October 4, 2012.

 

  1. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”.

Enoch Pratt Free Library, Mencken Memorial Lecture, Baltimore, MD, September 7,

2013.

 

  1. “Anatomy of Addiction”. Grand Rounds. New York University Langone Medical Center, New

York, NY, April 9, 2014.

 

  1. “When Germs Travel:  Contagious Crisis Over Time”. Monthly Scientific Seminar for the

Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology and Laboratory Services, U.S., Center s for

Disease Control, by satellite to Atlanta, GA, November 18, 2014.

 

  1. “Dispatches from the Ebola Punditocracy:  Using History to Help Shape the Public Discourse

on an Epidemic”. Board on Population Health , Institute of Medicine of the National

Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, November 20, 2014.

 

  1. “When Germs Travel:  Contagious Themes Across Time”. Testimony on Bioethical Issues of

the Ebola Epidemic of 2014. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues.

The White House, Washington, DC, February 5, 2015.

 

  1. “An Anatomy of Addiction:  Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug,

Cocaine”.  Tenth Anniversary Lecture. The McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics,

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston and the Houston History of

Medicine Society, Houston, TX, March 17, 2015.

 

  1. “Epidemics and Ethical Quandaries”. The McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics,

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, March 18, 2015.

 

  1. “Tall Tales of Medicine and the Human Condition.” Sherwin B. Nuland Lecture in Bioethics.

The Yale University Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, Yale University, New Haven,

CT, March 25, 2015.

 

  1. “An Anatomy of Addiction.” Grand Rounds, Department of Psychiatry.  Montefiore Hospital

and Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Bronx, NY, February 25, 2016.

 

  1. “Those Magic Times When a Patient Makes the Doctor Feel Better.” Commencement Address

at Graduation Ceremony. The University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV, May 13, 2016.

 

 

State of Michigan

  1. “Dickensian Diagnoses: Medical Aspects of the Novels of Charles Dickens,” Ann Arbor Chapter of the International Dickens Fellowship, Ann Arbor, MI, November 12, 1981.
  2. “Historical Aspects of Childbearing in the United States,” Botsford Community Hospital, Grand Rounds, Farmington, MI, November 22, 1993.
  3. “Epidemics and Quarantines: An Historical Perspective,” Visiting Professor, Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, Michigan State University-Kalamazoo Center for Medical Sciences, Kalamazoo, MI, June 3, 1994.
  4. “The History of Baby Care Advice Books in the United States,” Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, St. John’s Hospital, Detroit, MI, August 2, 1994.
  5. “Orphanages Reconsidered? Historical Perspectives on Dependent, Abandoned, and Orphaned Children in America,” Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, St. Joseph Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, September 7, 1995.
  6. “Henry Koplik, M.D., Immigrant Children of New York City, and the Description of Koplik’s Spots,” Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI, September 17, 1996.
  7. “American Baby Care Advice: A Look at the Early 20th Century,” Grand Rounds, Department of Pediatrics, DeVos Children’s Hospital at Butterworth, Grand Rapids, MI, April 1, 1997.
  8. “David Murray Cowie and Iodized Salt,” Ann Arbor Local History Museum/Kempf House, Ann Arbor, MI, March 12, 2002.
  9. “Medicine and Journalism: The Role of Academic Physicians in Public Information,” Annual Meeting Ivy-Atlantic Medical Alumni Magazine Association, Ann Arbor, MI, September 30, 2002.
  10. “Marijuana and Kids,” Office of National Drug Control Policy, National Youth Anti-Drug Media Program, Detroit, MI, April 9, 2003.
  11. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics in American History.” Ann Arbor District Library (Sunday Edition Series), Ann Arbor, MI, October 10, 2004.
  12. “How to Write a Book.” Saline Heritage Elementary School, Saline, MI, March 11, 2005.
  13. “The 50th Anniversary of the Successful Trials of the Salk Polio Vaccine,” Rotary Club of Ann Arbor, Ann Arbor, MI, April 6, 2005.
  14. “Using History to Tell the Story: Fiction and Non-Fiction,” The Ann Arbor Book Festival, Ann Arbor, MI, May 21, 2005.
  15. “When Germs Travel: Contagious Crises Across Time.” Keynote Speaker.  Great Lakes Border Health Initiative.  Michigan Department of Community Health in partnership with the Minnesota Department of Health, the New York State Department of Health, the Wisconsin Department of Health, the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Ann Arbor, MI, July 9, 2008.
  16. “When Germs Travel: Contagious Crises Across Time.” Keynote Speaker.  Caring for the Community: Preparing for the Influenza Pandemic.  Spectrum Health Hospitals and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Big Rapids, MI, September 21, 2009.
  17. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine” Ann Arbor District Public Library, Ann Arbor, MI, September 12, 2011.
  18. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. Headline Lecture, Annual Jewish Book Fair, Ann Arbor Jewish Community Center, Ann Arbor, MI, November 8, 2011.
  19. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. Headliner Lecture, 60th Annual Jewish Book Fair, Detroit Jewish Community Center, West Bloomfield, MI, November 13, 2011.
  20. “When Germs Travel: Contagious Crises Across History”. History Reads Program. Baldwin Public Library, Birmingham, MI.  November 21, 2015.
  21. “Detroit and the 1918 Influenza Pandemic”. Grand Rounds. Department of Health of the City of Detroit, Detroit, MI. January 15, 2016.
  22. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Freud, Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. Grand Rounds. Department of Psychiatry, Montefiore Hospital and Medical Center, Bronx, NY. February 25, 2016.
  23. “Detroit and the Flu of 1918: A Chapter from the UM-CDC 1918 Influenza Digital Encyclopedia.”  Grand Rounds, City of Detroit Department of Health, Detroit, MI. September 2, 2016.

 

 

INTRAMURAL INVITED PRESENTATIONS

University of Michigan Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases

  1. “David Murray Cowie, M.D. and the Institution of Iodized Salt in America,” Advances in Pediatrics, Postgraduate course on Pediatrics, May 21, 1984.
  2. “James L. Wilson and the Embryogenesis of the Iron Lung,” Advances in Pediatrics, Postgraduate course on Pediatrics, May 22, 1985.
  3. “The History of the University of Michigan Department of Pediatrics,” Grand Rounds, February 11, 1986.
  4. “Pediatrics, Progressives and Popular Child Care Advice,” Grand Rounds, November 26, 1991.
  5. “Knocking Out the Cholera: Epidemics, Quarantines and Immigration,” Grand Rounds, April 5, 1994.
  6. “Quarantines, Typhus Fever, and East European Jewish Immigration: Lessons from the Past for the Present,” Fifth Annual Pediatric Research Symposium, September 23, 1994.
  7. “The Plight of America’s Orphans,” Martin Luther King Day Address, January 24, 1995.
  8. “The Tuskegee Syphilis Study: Race and Public Health,” Martin Luther King Day Address, January 15, 1996.
  9. “Iodized Salt and Michigan,” Pediatrics 75th Anniversary Grand Rounds Lecture Series, February 25, 1997.
  10. “The Stigma of Disease: Historical Perspectives of Genetic Screening,” Grand Rounds, November 25, 1997.
  11. “An Example Worthy of Imitation”: The University of Michigan Medical School, 1850-2000, Grand Rounds, May 4, 1999.

 

University of Michigan Medical Center

  1. “What Hippocrates Said and How Modern Physicians Interpret Him,” Grand Rounds, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, May 19, 1994.
  2. “The Rise and Fall of Epidemics in American History,” Grand Rounds, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, March 9, 1995.
  3. “Teaching Literature and Medicine to Medical Students,” New Horizons in Medicine Program, MOMENT-UM, May 12, 1995.
  4. “A Lasting Tradition: Poverty and Disease in Our Health Care System,” Fifth Annual Medstart Conference on Children, January 25, 1997.
  5. “An Interactive History of the University of Michigan Medical School,” Medical Center Alumni Society Reunion 1997, September 20, 1997.
  6. “The Stigma of Genetic Disease: Race, Ethnicity, and the Early Genetic Screening Programs for Sickle Cell Disease and Tay-Sachs Disease,” Conference on Health Care Experiences of African-Americans in Southeastern Michigan, “How the Past Affects the Future,” Historical Center for the Health Sciences, October 29, 1997.
  7. “The Eyes Have It: Trachoma and the American Immigrant Experience, 1897-1924,” Program in Society and Medicine, April 22, 1998.
  8. “The Past is Prologue: A Brief History of the University of Michigan Medical School,” Medical Center Alumni Society Reunion 1998, September 12, 1998.
  9. “An Example Worthy of Imitation”: The University of Michigan Medical School, 1850-2000, Medical Center Alumni Society, Sesquicentennial Symposium, Chicago, IL, April 18, 1999.
  10. “An Example Worthy of Imitation”: The University of Michigan Medical School, 1850-2000, Medical Center Alumni Society, Sesquicentennial Symposium, Mackinac Island, MI, June 19, 1999.
  11. “Seven Scientists: A Heritage of Excellence at Michigan,” Dedication of the Medical School Lecture Halls in honor of the Sesquicentennial, University of Michigan Medical School, August 21, 2000.
  12. “For the Welfare of Children: Pediatrics and Public Health in the United States,” David Murray Cowie Symposium on the History of Pediatrics and Child Health in America, Historical Center for the Health Sciences, September 22, 2000.
  13. “An Example Worthy of Imitation”: The University of Michigan Medical School, 1850-2000, Sesquicentennial Celebration and Medical Center Alumni Society Reunion 2000, October 13, 2000.
  14. “Prescribing Arrowsmith: Sinclair Lewis, Frederick Novy, and the University of Michigan.” Presented at Centennial Celebration of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, May 17, 2003.
  15. “’I Swear by Apollo:’ On Taking the Hippocratic Oath.” Presented at the Plastic Surgery Research Council, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, June 10, 2004.
  16. “Memory and History: Our Experiences at the University of Michigan Medical School.” University of Michigan Medical Center Alumni Society Annual Reunion, Ann Arbor, MI, October 8, 2004.
  17. “The Medical Detectives: The Amazing Case of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle, and Robert Koch’s ‘Cure’ for Tuberculosis.” The Dean’s Lecture, The University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, February 21, 2006.
  18. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine.”

Global Engagement of Doctoral Education between University of Michigan and Trinity College, Dublin and the 130th Anniversary of the Department of Physiology, Ann Arbor, MI, October 5, 2012.

 

 

 

University of Michigan

  1. “The Hippocratic Oath,” Aaron Brown Memorial Lecture of the Phi Delta Epsilon Society, April 13, 1994.
  2. “Epidemics and Quarantines on New York’s Lower East Side: The Immigrant East European Jewish Perspective,” Colloquium in American Jewish Studies, Frankel Center for Judaic Studies and the Program in American Culture, October 26, 1994.
  3. “The Concept of Quarantine: What Can We Learn From History?” Clements Library Lecture of the Victor Vaughan Society for the History and Philosophy of Medicine, December 6, 1994.
  4. “Immigration and Public Health: Historical Approaches,” Colloquium, Department of Sociology and the Population Studies Center, November 20, 1995.
  5. “East European Jewish Immigrants in New York City: A Medical Historical Perspective,” Colloquium, Center for Russian and East European Studies, January 24, 1996.
  6. “Genetic-Based Discrimination: The Stigma of Disease,” Genetics and Law Course (Professor R. Eisenberg), Law School, March 12, 1997.
  7. “Immigration and Public Health,” School of Public Health, April 9, 1997.
  8. The Short Stories of Dr. William Carlos Williams: A Panel Discussion, University of Michigan Year of the Humanities and Arts, March 11, 1998.
  9. “Personal Reflections on the Culture of Death in America,” Death and Its Enemies: A Conference Co-sponsored by University of Michigan Life Sciences, Values and Society Program and the Project on Death in America, Open Society Institute, University of Michigan Rackham Auditorium, December 2, 2000.
  10. “Germ Culture: The History of Bioterrorism”. Bioterrorism and Public Health Response Course.  38th Annual Graduate Summer Session on Epidemiology.  University of Michigan School of Public Health, July 8, 2003.
  11. “Globalization and Public Health.” University of Michigan Learning in Retirement Distinguished Lecture Series, Ann Arbor, Michigan, February 10, 2004.
  12. “When Germs Travel: Epidemics and Anxiety in Modern America.” Opening Plenary Address, Reframing Infectious Disease: An International Conference Probing the Relevance of the Humanities to Epidemiology, Disease Models and the Global AIDS Pandemic.  Institute for the Humanities, Ann Arbor, Michigan, December 2, 2004.
  13. “Thomas Francis Jr. and the Historical Context of Today’s Celebration.” Opening talk, Advancing Global Public Health in Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Polio Vaccine Announcement and Presentation of the Thomas Francis, Jr. Medal. University of Michigan, April 12, 2005.
  14. “The History of Polio.” Moderator, Panel Discussion, Advancing Global Public Health in Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Polio Vaccine Announcement and Presentation of the Thomas Francis, Jr. Medal. University of Michigan, April 12, 2005.
  15. “When Germs Travel.” College of Literature, Science and the Arts Alumni Reunion Meeting, University of Michigan, May 20, 2005.
  16. “When Germs Travel: An Update.” Honors College, College of Literature, Science and the Arts, University of Michigan, November 11, 2005.
  17. “Contemplating Pandemics.” Tom D. Rowe 45th Annual Pharmacy Lectures, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, October 27, 2006.
  18. “A Historically-Based Thought Experiment: Meeting New Challenges for Children’s Health and Well-being.”  Fedele F. and Iris M. Fauri Memorial Lecture.  University of Michigan School of Social Work.  Ann Arbor, MI.  October 24, 2007.
  19. “Closing the Schools to Control Contagious Diseases: Clarifying the Decision Making Criteria.” Public Health Grand Rounds, Office of Public Health Practice, University of Michigan, School of Public Health, November 23, 2009.
  20. “When Germs Travel”. Authors’ Forum at the University of Michigan, January 20, 2010.
  21. “Commencement Address”. Department of English Literature and Language, College of Literature, Science and the Arts, The University of Michigan, April 30, 2010.
  22. “April 12, 1955: Tommy Francis, Polio and the University of Michigan” Influenza as a Global Concern: Where Do We Go From Here? A Symposium in Honor of Professor Arnold S. Monto.  University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, November 12, 2010.
  23. “An Anatomy of Addiction: Sigmund Freud, William Halsted and the Miracle Drug Cocaine”. Author’s Forum at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, October 12, 2011.
  24. Addictions and History: The Biennel Asa Gray Lecture, University of Michigan Commons, Ann Arbor, MI, October 6, 2016.

 

 

COMMITTEE AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICE

National

1990-1995       Co-chair, Clinician-Historian Group, American Association for the History of Medicine

1994-1997       Executive Council, American Association for the History of Medicine

1997                Osler Medal Committee, American Association for the History of Medicine

1997-1998       Program Committee, Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Scholars Annual Meeting for 1998, Tucson, Arizona

1998-2000       Selection Committee, Klemperer Fellowship. New York Academy of Medicine, New York, New York

1998-1999       Fielding H. Garrison Lectureship Committee, American Association for the History of Medicine

1998-1999       Chair, Program Committee, Robert Wood Johnson Generalist Faculty Scholars Meeting for 1999, Tucson, Arizona

1999-2002       Pre-Selection Committee, Center for Scholars and Writer, The New York Public Library, New York, New York

2002                Member, William Welch Medal Committee, American Association for the History of Medicine

2003                Chair, William Welch Medal Committee, American Association for the History of Medicine

2003                Chair, Stanley Jackson Prize for Best Article, Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, Oxford University Press

2003-2004       Academic Advisory Council, Celebrate 350: Jewish Life in America, 1654-2004 National Committee

2012                Planning Committee on Childhood Vaccines and the Public Attitudes, American Academy of Arts and Sciences

2015                Selection and Judging Committee, New York Academy of Medicine Urban Health Journalism Prize

 

University of Michigan Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases

1993                Primary Pediatric Care Grant Task Force Committee

1993                Pediatric Emergency Medicine Division Faculty Search Committee

1993-1995       General Pediatrics Division Faculty Search Committee

1995-1997       Chair, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases 75th Anniversary Committee

1998-1999       Chair, History Committee

 

University of Michigan Medical Center

1993-1994       Genome Ethics Advisory Committee

1997-2000       Medical School Sesquicentennial Committee

2001-2004       Dean’s Communications Advisory Committee

2004-               Medical School Center Directors’ Committee

2004-2006       Task Force on the Research Enterprise Committee

2005-2010       Medical Scientist Training Program Career Advisory Panel

2005- 2006      Co-Chair, Department of Psychiatry Centennial Committee

 

University of Michigan

1995-1997       University Musical Society Advisory Committee

1996-1998       Year of Humanities and Arts Planning Committee (Office of the Vice President for Research)

1998-               President’s Committee on History and Traditions of the University of Michigan (Acting Chair, 2002-2003)

1998-2001       Executive Steering Committee, The University of Michigan-Detroit Observatory

1999-2001       Executive Board, Friends of the University of Michigan Libraries

2001                Judge, Avery Hopwood Writing Awards, The University of Michigan

2002                Search Committee, Special Counsel to the President for Communications

2004-2005       President’s Committee for the 50th Anniversary of the Salk Polio Vaccine Announcement Celebration

2006-               President’s Infectious Hazards Planning Group

2009                President’s Selection Committee for the Thomas Francis Medal in Global Health.

2012                Co-Chair, Bicentennial Planning Committee

 

 

PUBLIC AND COMMUNITY SERVICE

International

1992                Medical Consultant, Third Shigeyoshi Matsumae Memorial Moscow State University International Baseball Tournament, Moscow, Russia (June 23 – July 2)

1995                Partnership 2000 Program of the Jewish Federation-United Jewish Agencies –  University of Michigan Mission to Israel

 

National

1987-1989       Assistant Physician, Dunbar Middle School Clinic, Baltimore, MD

1990-1993       Attending Physician, Chase-Brexton Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Clinic, Baltimore, MD

1992-1993       Team Physician, Johns Hopkins University Baseball Team, Baltimore, MD

1999                Member, History Advisory Board on Immigration Curriculum for New York City Elementary, Intermediate and High Schools, New-York Historical Society and the New York City Board of Education, New York City, NY

1999                Member, School Health Commission, Board of Education of the City of New York

2000                U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, Public Technical Advisory Group on the MIDAS (Microfilm Digitization Application System) Project (October 20, 2000)

2003                Chicago Museum of Science and Industry 21st Century Initiative Task Force

2005                Institute of Medicine, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice in collaboration with U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Dialogue on Pandemic Influenza, Washington, D.C. (December 10-11, 2005)

2006                U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/RAND Corporation Expert Panel on Nonpharmaceutical Interventions for Pandemic Influenza, Alexandria, VA (January 17-18, 2006)

2006                Expert Panel on Modeling Studies on the Spread of Novel Influenza Viruses, National Vaccine Program Office, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C. (May 17, 2006)

2006                Workshop on Behavioral Epidemiology, Models of Infectious Disease Agents Study (MIDAS), Sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Brookings Institution, Seattle, WA (June 21-22, 2006)

2006                Workshop on The Ethical and Legal Considerations in Mitigating Pandemic Diseases. Board on global Health, Forum on Microbial Threats, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Washington D.C. (September 19-20, 2006)

2007                Stakeholders Workshop on Community Mitigation Strategies for Pandemic Influenza. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (December 12-13, 2007)

2008                Planning Meeting on Border Security, Transportation and Movement of Infectious Diseases and International Health Regulations. Forum on Microbial Threats, Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, Washington D.C. (February 13-14, 2008)

2008                Workshop on Community Mitigation Strategies and Nonpharmaceutical Interventions for Pandemic Influenza.  U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (March 19-20, 2008)

2008                Workshop on Pandemic Influenza Preparedness, U.S. Agency for International Development, Arlington, VA (May 27, 2008)

2009-2011       Member, “B”, Expert Panel Advising the Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Novel Influenza A/H1N1 Outbreak (April 24, 2009-February, 2010)

2009                Consultant, Subcommittee on Novel A/H1N1 Influenza Pandemic Meeting, The President’s Council on Science and Technology, Executive Office of the President of the United States, The White House, Washington D.C., July 16-17, 2009

2015                Expert Witness, 20th Meeting of the U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, 20th Meeting on Ebola Fever in the United States, February 5-6, 2015

State of Michigan

1993-1994       Attending Physician, Corner Adolescent and Youth Clinic, Ypsilanti, MI

1994-1999       Attending Physician, Becker Memorial Clinic for the Uninsured, Ann Arbor, MI

1995-1996       Medical Consultant, Partnership 2000 Program of the Jewish Federation-United Jewish Agencies, Detroit, MI

1996-1999       Medical Consultant, Freedom House Immigration Center, Detroit, MI